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Editorial Results (free)

1. How well did the Fed's stimulus work? -

NEW YORK (AP) — Soaring inflation. A collapsing dollar. Bubbles in financial markets that would soon pop. One presidential candidate even suggested that the Federal Reserve chairman should be roughed up.

2. US stands strong despite fear over global slowdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Beyond the turmoil shaking financial markets, the U.S. economy remains sturdier than many seem to fear.

The Dow Jones industrial average has lost 874 points since Oct. 8, largely over worries about another recession in Europe, a slowdown in China and world-spanning crises that include the Ebola outbreak and the rise of the Islamic State.

3. US stocks end dramatic week with rally -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market capped a turbulent week with a big gain Friday, a sign of renewed investor confidence after days of gloomy economic news.

It was the latest large move for a market which, with a few exceptions, has been on a mostly downward track since last month. Stocks have had four weeks of declines, leaving the Standard & Poor's 500 index 6 percent below the record high from Sept. 18.

4. Bond prices surge the most since financial crisis -

NEW YORK (AP) — Investors flooded into the U.S. Treasury market in a way not seen since the depths of the financial crisis, causing the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note to fall below 2 percent for the first time in more than a year.

5. Geithner grilled in court over AIG bailout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Timothy Geithner, a key player in the U.S. government's 2008 bailout of American International Group Inc., is due back in court Wednesday in a trial of a lawsuit filed by the insurance giant's former CEO over the handling of the rescue.

6. NY state: Wall St. profits $8.7B in 6 months -

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — The securities industry in New York City tallied $8.7 billion in profits during the first half of 2014, which was 13 percent lower than the same period last year as it continued to deal with the fallout from the 2008 financial crisis, New York's comptroller reported Tuesday.

7. Paulson: AIG bailout designed to be punishment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The 2008 government bailout of American International Group Inc. was specifically designed to punish the insurance giant, former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson said in U.S. court Monday.

8. Stocks flat as oil drop offsets ECB stimulus -

NEW YORK (AP) — A slump in oil prices weighed on the stock market Thursday, pushing the Standard & Poor's 500 index to its third straight loss.

Stocks had started the day higher after the European Central Bank surprised investors by announcing that it had cut its benchmark interest rate to a record low and planned to purchase asset-backed securities in an effort to stimulate the region's ailing economy. Investors were also cheered by some encouraging reports on the U.S. economy.

9. US stocks rise on European Central Bank stimulus -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rose Thursday after the European Central Bank surprised traders by trimming its main interest rate to a record low, and announcing that it would purchase asset-backed securities in an effort to stimulate the region's ailing economy.

10. Some fear auto industry returning to bad habits -

DETROIT (AP) — Big discounts. Six- or seven-year loans, in some cases to buyers who would have been turned down in the past.

As the auto industry strives to sustain its post-recession comeback, car companies are resorting to tactics that some experts warn will lead to trouble down the road.

11. SEC adopts rules on loan-backed securities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Financial firms that sell securities backed by loans, like the kind that fueled the 2008 financial crisis, will have to give investors details on borrowers' credit record and income under action taken Wednesday by federal regulators.

12. Yellen to give her outlook as Fed honeymoon fades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Janet Yellen has won credit for guiding the Federal Reserve's first six months of transition from the Ben Bernanke era. Bernanke's Fed had steered the U.S. economy through a grave crisis by slashing interest rates and restoring confidence in banks. Yellen has so far carried on his approach with barely a hiccup.

13. That Realtor key box might welcome unwanted visitors -

This one may get me in trouble with some of my peers, but it is important, so here goes.

First, some background.

In most cases, when a buyer’s agents schedule appointments for showings, they find the properties on MLS and print the listing sheets.

14. Lighter sentences sought for some business crimes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal panel that sets sentencing policy eased penalties this year for potentially tens of thousands of nonviolent drug offenders. Now, defense lawyers and prisoner advocates are pushing for similar treatment for a different category of defendants: swindlers, embezzlers, insider traders and other white-collar criminals.

15. Sentencing changes sought for business crimes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal panel that sets sentencing policy eased penalties this year for potentially tens of thousands of drug dealers. Now, defense lawyers and prisoner advocates are pushing for similar treatment for an arguably less-sympathetic category of defendants: swindlers, embezzlers, insider traders and other white-collar criminals.

16. AP source: Bank of America nears $16-$17B settlement with US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bank of America is nearing a $16 billion to $17 billion settlement to resolve an investigation into its role in the sale of mortgage-backed securities before the 2008 financial crisis, a person directly familiar with the matter said Wednesday.

17. 21st Century Fox abandons pursuit of Time Warner -

Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox is abandoning its attempt to take over Time Warner in a proposed deal that would have combined two of the world's biggest media companies.

The about-face announced Tuesday comes three weeks after Time Warner Inc. revealed that it had rejected 21st Century Fox's unsolicited $76 billion buyout offer.

18. Fed offers no clearer hint on first rate increase -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is further slowing the pace of its bond purchases because it thinks an improving U.S. economy needs less help. But it's offering no clearer hint of when it will start raising its key short-term interest rate.

19. Morgan Stanley paying $275M to settle SEC charges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Morgan Stanley has agreed to pay $275 million to settle U.S. civil charges that it misled investors about risky mortgage bonds it sold ahead of the 2008 financial crisis.

20. Fed split on signals for first rate increase -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials had differing views in June on the best way to signal to financial markets when they might raise a key short-term interest rate. They were in broad agreement, however, that they will likely announce an end to their monthly bond buying program in October.

21. June jobs report shows US recovery is accelerating -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A surprisingly robust job market is energizing the 5-year-old U.S. recovery and driving the economy closer to full health.

Employers added 288,000 jobs in June and helped cut the unemployment rate to 6.1 percent, the lowest since 2008. It was the fifth straight gain above 200,000 — the best such stretch since the late 1990s tech boom.

22. Stocks end lower as traders sell blue chips -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market had its biggest decline in two weeks Tuesday, led by a sell-off in blue-chip bank and energy stocks. Homebuilders rose after the government reported sales of new homes rose in May to the highest level in six years.

23. Obama encouraging family-friendly work policies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said Monday that the United States should join the rest of the industrialized world and offer paid leave for mothers of newborns.

"Many women can't even get a paid day off to give birth — now that's a pretty low bar," Obama said at the White House Summit on Working Families. "That, we should be able to take care of."

24. Ni hao, y'all: US hinterlands woo Chinese firms -

PINE HILL, Ala. (AP) — Burdened with Alabama's highest unemployment rate, long abandoned by textile mills and furniture plants, Wilcox County desperately needs jobs.

They're coming, and from a most unlikely place: Henan Province, China, 7,600 miles away.

25. Wealth gap vacation: Six-bedroom suite or just a couch? -

NEW YORK (AP) — Private elevators, personal shopping assistants, six-bedroom suites with their own postal codes. Even helipads. This is what the super-rich have come to expect from hotels.

For others, vacation now means renting someone's apartment, a spare room, maybe just a couch — anything to save on the cost of a hotel.

26. How Low Can We Go? -

With the S&P 500 back at all-time highs, investors may be experiencing a bit of altitude sickness. With the S&P 500 now up 180 percent from the bottom, it’s right to question how much upside remains. However, the better question might be how much downside lies below.

27. Aegis Health selects chief executive officer -

Phillip Suiter has been named CEO at Aegis Health Group, a privately held, Nashville-based company specializing in the development and execution of revenue growth strategies for hospitals.

28. One million new residents headed to Middle Tennessee: Where will they live? Will we be ready? -

For Middle Tennessee, the question is not, “If we build it, will they come?” It’s more like, “How will we build it before they come?” During the next 20 years, Middle Tennessee’s 10-county region will absorb 1 million new residents. That’s twice the growth rate of the rest of the nation.

29. Target CEO Steinhafel out in wake of data breach -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target's massive data breach has now cost the company's CEO his job.

Target announced Monday that Chairman, President and CEO Gregg Steinhafel is out nearly five months after the retailer disclosed the breach, which has hurt its reputation among customers and hammered its business.

30. Ford's profit falls 39 percent in first quarter -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Ford Motor Co.'s worldwide sales rose in the first quarter, propelled by growing strength in Asia and Europe. But weakness in North America dragged down the company's profit.

31. Regulators act to require stronger bank capital -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Regulators are acting to require U.S. banks to build a sturdier financial base to lessen the risk that they could collapse and cause a global meltdown.

The eight biggest banks will have to meet stricter measures for holding capital — money that provides a cushion against unexpected losses — under a rule that regulators are adopting Tuesday.

32. Fed blocks Citigroup from raising dividends -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve on Wednesday barred Citigroup from raising its dividend or boosting its stock buybacks, saying it's too hard to predict how some parts of the bank's global operation would fare in a sharp economic downturn.

33. Nearly all major US banks pass Fed 'stress tests' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than five years after the financial crisis struck, the biggest U.S. banks are better able to withstand a severe recession than at any time since the meltdown, the Federal Reserve has determined.

34. NY comptroller: Average Wall St. bonus over $164K -

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — The average bonus paid to securities industry employees in New York City grew 15 percent last year to more than $164,000, the largest average Wall Street bonus since the 2008 financial crisis and the third highest on record, New York's state comptroller reported Wednesday.

35. Target exec's departure puts spotlight on CIOs -

NEW YORK (AP) — The departure of Target's chief information officer in the wake of the company's massive pre-Christmas data breach highlights the increased pressure facing executives who are charged with protecting corporate computer systems from hackers whose attacks are on the rise and becoming more sophisticated.

36. Yellen: Fed monitoring recent weaker economic data -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen noted Thursday that recent economic data have pointed to weaker-than-expected gains in consumer spending and job growth. She said the Fed will be watching to see whether the slowdown proves only a temporary blip caused by severe winter weather.

37. Solid new-home sales lift hopes for housing market -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A surprisingly strong pace of new-home sales last month has boosted hopes that the spring buying season will be solid enough to lift the overall economy.

Sales of new homes rebounded in January to the fastest rate in more than five years. The strength in purchases followed a slowdown that had been linked to higher mortgage rates and severe winter weather.

38. Mexico to trump Japan as No. 2 car exporter to US -

CELAYA, Mexico (AP) — Mexico is on track to become the United States' No. 1 source of imported cars by the end of next year, overtaking Japan and Canada in a manufacturing boom that's turning the auto industry into a bigger source of dollars than money sent home by migrants.

39. Stocks slip as Fed rate talk spooks some investors -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks fell Wednesday as investors were left uneasy by news that Federal Reserve policymakers were willing to start raising short-term interest rates sooner than previously expected.

40. Reporting based on NSA leaks wins Polk Award -

NEW YORK (AP) — Four journalists who reported on the extent of the National Security Agency's secret surveillance based on documents leaked by Edward Snowden are among the winners of the 65th annual George Polk Awards in Journalism.

41. Suspense in Senate: Debt vote shrouded in secrecy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Financial markets were watching, the retirement accounts of millions of Americans on the line.

Nervous senators were watching too, well aware that political fortunes could be on the line.

42. Yellen to investors: Expect continuity at the Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen sought Tuesday to reassure investors that she will embrace the approach to interest-rate policy that her predecessor, Ben Bernanke, pursued before he stepped down as chairman last month.

43. Millions for makeovers: Even newer downtown hotels are spending big to compete for Music City Center guests -

The Hilton Nashville Downtown is wrapping up the first phase of its multi-million dollar renovation, with all 330 suites taken back to the walls and outfitted with all new upgrades.

On Feb. 1, the new upscale Hilton Honors Lounge opens downstairs at the hotel. Phase 2 begins next month with an overhaul of the lobby, and in April, a new restaurant concept will be added to the list.

44. Wealth gap: A guide to what it is, why it matters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From the White House to the Vatican to the business elite in Davos, Switzerland, one issue keeps seizing the agenda: the growing gap between the very wealthy and everyone else.

It's "the defining challenge of our time," says President Barack Obama, who will spotlight the issue in his State of the Union address Tuesday night. A Gallup poll finds two-thirds of Americans are unhappy with the nation's distribution of wealth. Experts say it may be slowing the economy.

45. JPMorgan boosts CEO Dimon's pay to $20 million -

NEW YORK (AP) — JPMorgan Chase almost doubled Chairman and CEO Jamie Dimon's pay for 2013, rewarding the executive for settling probes against the bank.

Dimon will receive total compensation of $20 million in 2013, consisting of $18.5 million in stock options and a base salary of $1.5 million, the bank said in a statement Friday.

46. Lack of office space slows Sumner’s momentum -

For businesses considering a geographic change, Hendersonville is a natural fit with its proximity to Nashville and access to all of the perks of the ‘It City.’

Located just 18 miles from downtown Nashville, and 20 miles from the airport, Hendersonville also has nearly 30 miles of premium Old Hickory Lake shoreline. Housing options are abundant, and suitable for all economic levels of employees.

47. Tony Giarratana: Having fun, taking risks, reshaping Nashville's skyline -

Nashville’s skyline has barely changed since 2008, the year Pinnacle Tower was completed. That’s too long for Tony Giarratana.

The developer who built downtown’s first high-rise apartment building – the Cumberland – and the first condominium tower – the Viridian – had announced plans to launch a half-dozen new projects in the downtown, SoBro and Midtown districts. Together, those projects have a value of at least $500 million.

48. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for Dec. 2013 -

Top December 2013 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

49. AMP planners uninterested in compromise that could increase West End-area support, cut costs -

If Mayor Karl Dean gets his signature $175 million mass transit initiative, The Amp bus rapid transit line, it will be one of his key political achievements.

Most Nashvillians agree on the need for better transit solutions to accommodate coming growth to Davidson County and the greater metropolitan region. But the controversial Amp initiative has the potential to become Dean’s Waterloo – or, worse, his next Fairgrounds.

50. An early gain fades on Wall Street; GM slumps -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market is continuing to have a sluggish start to the New Year.

Major indexes are finishing mixed on Wall Street on Friday, the second day of trading in 2014.

51. The world braces for retirement crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A global retirement crisis is bearing down on workers of all ages.

Spawned years before the Great Recession and the financial meltdown in 2008, the crisis was significantly worsened by those twin traumas. It will play out for decades, and its consequences will be far-reaching.

52. Google's top searches peer into society's mindset -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Death, devices and celebrity drove the quest for more information on Google's search engine this year.

Three of the world's four fastest-rising search requests on Google were triggered by the deaths of famous men.

53. The healing continues -

With another successful earnings season in the books, earnings news will move to the backburner for financial market observers. In the midst of this earnings vacuum, economic news moves to the forefront, as investors try to determine if the strong earnings will be sustainable via a healing economy. Or, if the economic support is beginning to deteriorate, perhaps earnings have peaked.

54. How Volcker Rule would limit banks' risky bets -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The rule that U.S. regulators approved Tuesday, after years of wrestling over its language, is designed to defuse the kind of risk-taking on Wall Street that helped trigger the 2008 financial crisis.

55. US ban on high-risk bank trades approved -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks will be barred in most cases from trading for their own profit under a federal rule approved Tuesday.

The Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. each unanimously voted to adopt the so-called Volcker Rule, taking a major step toward preventing extreme risk-taking on Wall Street that helped trigger the 2008 financial crisis.

56. Rising riches: 1 in 5 in US reaches affluence during lifetime -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's not just the wealthiest 1 percent.

Fully 20 percent of U.S. adults become rich for parts of their lives, wielding outsize influence on America's economy and politics. This little-known group may pose the biggest barrier to reducing the nation's income inequality.

57. US banks earn $36 billion in third quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks earned less in the July-September quarter than they did a year earlier, marking their first year-over-year profit decline since the spring of 2009 when the country was still mired in the Great Recession.

58. JPMorgan $13B deal may not end bank's legal woes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The $13 billion settlement that JPMorgan Chase agreed to Tuesday is the largest ever between the Justice Department and a corporation. Yet it isn't likely the end of the bank's legal troubles over the risky mortgage securities it sold before the financial crisis.

59. Despite surge, many don't see a stock bubble -

NEW YORK (AP) — Is the stock market due for a pullback?

The Dow Jones industrial average has surged 900 points since early October and crossed the 16,000-point threshold Monday. IPOs are hot again. Small investors, stirred from their post-recession daze, are coming back to stocks. And it's been more than two years since the market has had a significant slump.

60. David Taylor: Catering to Nashville’s GLBT community with restaurant, clubs patrons ‘wouldn’t mind bringing their mother to’ -

Visitors to Tribe, Play Dance Bar or Suzy Wong’s House of Yum, a triad of GLBT-owned and operated venues in the 1500 block of Church Street in the shadow of Downtown Nashville, see well-run, crowded operations that patrons “wouldn’t mind bringing their mother to,” co-owner David Taylor says.

61. Challenges abound for Twitter heading into IPO -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Twitter has built a digital town square that's teeming with activity but riddled with financial potholes. Seven years after co-founder Jack Dorsey sent the first tweet through the online messaging service, more than 500 million posts are shared each day by everyone from the Dalai Lama to Justin Bieber.

62. Senate blocks Obama picks for judge, housing posts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans blocked President Barack Obama's nominees to lead an influential federal court and a housing agency on Thursday, despite Democratic warnings of a return to last summer's partisan brawl over who wields power in the Senate.

63. GM hints at dividend, stock buyback on 3Q profit -

DETROIT (AP) — Another solid quarterly performance at General Motors brought the strongest talk yet of the automaker paying a dividend for the first time in five years, or perhaps buying back stock.

64. NY comptroller: Wall Street profits may slow -

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Though Wall Street recorded $10.1 billion in profits for the first half of 2013, New York's comptroller said Tuesday that federal budget dithering, higher interest rates and litigation may slow earnings for the last half in a securities industry that's kept trimming jobs.

65. Harley-Davidson profit jumps 21 pct as sales rise -

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Harley-Davidson's third-quarter earnings rose 21 percent as motorcycle sales rose in the U.S. and abroad.

The Milwaukee company says U.S. sales were up 20 percent from July through September as buyers responded to its new model lineup, introduced in mid-August. The quarter continued the company's comeback from the 2008 economic meltdown.

66. GE profit slips in 3Q, but tops estimates -

NEW YORK (AP) — General Electric said Friday that net income fell 9 percent in the third quarter as the company struggles to grow revenue and profits after shedding media and banking assets. But improving industrial performance helped the company beat Wall Street expectations.

67. Stocks slide as investors wait on Washington -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market's slow bleed got a little worse Tuesday.

The decline is the result of squabbling in Washington over raising the nation's debt limit and a government shutdown that has dragged on for more than a week. Moderate losses for the stock market in the first days of the shutdown have accelerated this week as the U.S. has moved closer to an Oct. 17 deadline for lifting the government's borrowing authority.

68. ‘Trickle-up economics’ boon for real estate buyers, sellers -

The late Ronald Reagan delivered some of the best one-liners, sometimes two-liners, of any modern-day president.

In a presidential debate, Hank Trewhitt of the Baltimore Sun asked then-Pres. Reagan the following: “You are already the oldest president in history, and some on your staff say that you were tired.”

69. Shutdown gives Obama unlikely ally: big business -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Business leaders are taking sides with Democratic President Barack Obama after failing to persuade their traditional Republican allies in Congress to avert a government shutdown.

70. JPMorgan pays $920M, admits fault in trading loss -

WASHINGTON (AP) — JPMorgan Chase & Co. will pay $920 million and has admitted that it failed to oversee trading that led to a $6 billion loss and renewed worries about serious risk-taking by major banks.

71. JPMorgan pays $920M, admits fault in trading loss -

WASHINGTON (AP) — JPMorgan Chase & Co. will pay $920 million and has admitted that it failed to oversee trading that led to a $6 billion loss and renewed worries about serious risk-taking by major banks.

72. Stock market sets record after Fed keeps stimulus -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market hit a record high Wednesday as investors cheered the Federal Reserve's surprise decision to keep its economic stimulus program in place, at least for now.

Stocks traded slightly lower throughout the morning, but took off immediately after the Fed's decision in the early afternoon. Bond yields fell sharply — their biggest move in nearly two years. Meanwhile, the price of gold jumped as some traders anticipated that the Fed's decision might cause inflation.

73. Google loses appeal in Street View snooping case -

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — Attorneys suing Google for enabling its camera-carrying vehicles to collect emails and Internet passwords while photographing neighborhoods for the search giant's popular "Street View" maps look forward to resuming their case now that a federal appeals court has ruled in their favor.

74. Stocks edge higher after encouraging jobs reports -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks edged higher Thursday after a pair of reports provided more evidence that the U.S. is maintaining a slow but steady economic recovery.

The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits dropped last week and is near the lowest level since June 2008, the Labor Department said Thursday. Weekly applications are just 1,000 above a five-year low reached last month.

75. No surprises for Alexander and GOP incumbents -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Faced with a potentially serious primary challenger, Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander was not about to sit back and wait.

The former two-term governor locked down endorsements, banked more than $3 million and linked arms with popular Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky and former GOP presidential contender Mike Huckabee. When conservative state Rep. Joe Carr announced he would challenge Alexander, the senator's team was ready.

76. Nasdaq trading halts; stocks up on positive data -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market rose Thursday but it was a glitch on the Nasdaq exchange that became the day's big talking point.

Trading on the Nasdaq was interrupted just after midday because of problems with a quote dissemination system. That halted activity on the Nasdaq until shortly before the close of the market. When trading resumed, shares in Nasdaq OMX, which owns and operates the exchange, slumped.

77. Why the stock market is having a chilly August -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's been a chilly August for the stock market.

At the start of the month, the Dow Jones industrial average and Standard & Poor's 500 index hit all-time highs. Now the market is down 4 percent from its peak, and August is on track to be the Dow's worst month since May 2012.

78. Worth the trip: Midstate is home to a variety of well-loved restaurants -

There are certain signs that are sure to tip off whether you’ve found a dining gem.

If you call and the owner can’t talk because she is “up to her elbows in red velvet cake” (Miller’s Grocery, Christiana), then you know it might be worth a stop.

79. 'A part of their life forever' -

When music executive Tony Brown wanted to propose to his wife, he turned to one of his regular haunts for the big event, Giovanni Ristorante.

He’s not the only one. The West End restaurant has been host to a number of proposals since it first opened in 2008.

80. Weak earnings tug stocks lower on Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — Disappointing earnings news and a slump in bank stocks tugged the stock market lower early Wednesday, putting major indexes on track for their first three-day drop since June.

81. States consider regulation of drones in US skies -

CINCINNATI (AP) — Thousands of civilian drones are expected in U.S. skies within a few years and concerns they could be used to spy on Americans are fueling legislative efforts in several states to regulate the unmanned aircraft.

82. Fully-owned NBCUniversal boosts Comcast 2Q results -

NEW YORK (AP) — The decision by Comcast Corp., the country's largest cable company, to buy General Electric out of the NBCUniversal business looks like a smart one, as the media conglomerate posted strong results for the second quarter.

83. Feds charge hedge fund SAC Capital in NY case -

NEW YORK (AP) — The hedge fund operated by embattled billionaire Steven A. Cohen made hundreds of millions of dollars illegally and allowed unprecedented and pervasive insider trading to go unchecked for years, federal prosecutors said in an indictment unsealed Thursday.

84. Feds charge hedge fund SAC Capital in NY case -

NEW YORK (AP) — The hedge fund operated by embattled billionaire Steven A. Cohen made hundreds of millions of dollars illegally and allowed unprecedented and pervasive insider trading to go on unchecked for years, federal prosecutors said in an indictment unsealed Thursday.

85. Student Loans 101: Why Uncle Sam is your banker -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Congress scrambles to pull back a messy student loan increase, it raises the question: Why did Uncle Sam get into the college loan business, anyway?

The short answer: Because the Russians launched Sputnik.

86. Two acts remain in Bernanke’s screenplay -

After weeks of volatility, driven by complex Fed speculation after a chorus of mixed messages, Chairman Bernanke re-focused marketplace attention on the Fed’s core purpose.

As per Congress, The Federal Reserve Act directs: “the Federal Reserve...shall maintain long run growth of the monetary and credit aggregates commensurate with the economy’s long run potential…to promote the goals of maximum employment, stable prices and moderate long-term interest rates.”

87. Wells Fargo Q2 profit rises 20 pct -

Wells Fargo, the biggest U.S. mortgage lender, said Friday its second-quarter profit surged 20 percent as it cut expenses.

Net income rose to $5.27 billion from $4.40 billion a year earlier. On a per-share basis, earnings were 98 cents, beating the 93 cents forecast by Wall Street.

88. Retailers report strong gains for June -

NEW YORK (AP) — June sales heated up for stores.

Costco Corp., Fred's Inc. and Stein Mart Inc. were among the retailers that reported their strongest sales gains since January, as shoppers, enticed by warm weather and an improving economy, took advantage of summer discounts.

89. Market rises: less on Fed chatter, more on economy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street got back to focusing on the economy instead of the Federal Reserve on Tuesday, sending stocks higher.

Four reports showed a brightening U.S. economy. Housing and manufacturing continued to improve, and consumer confidence hit its highest level in 5 1/2 years.

90. Olive Garden luring diners with cheaper prices -

NEW YORK (AP) — If the free breadsticks and unlimited soup and salad aren't enough, Olive Garden is hitting the gas on other promotions to get customers through its doors.

Darden Restaurants Inc., which has been struggling to hold onto customers in recent years, said deal offers like "2 for $25" dinner special helped drive up customer traffic at its flagship Olive Garden and Red Lobster chains in the latest quarter. The company said it will keep stressing the affordability of its food in the year ahead to attract more diners.

91. Oil climbs above $98 ahead of Fed policy news -

The price of oil rose above $98 Tuesday as traders awaited the latest word on both the Federal Reserve's monetary policy and U.S. oil supplies.

Benchmark oil for July delivery rose 67 cents to close at $98.44 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

92. Getz: BRT plan would worsen West End traffic -

The Metro Transit Authority’s plan for a bus rapid transit installation on Nashville’s East-West Corridor has two fundamental problems:

Removing two lanes from traffic dramatically increases congestion with adverse effects of residents and businesses.

93. US proposes labeling some nonbanks threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators have proposed that a group of firms that aren't banks be deemed potential threats to the financial system that need stricter government oversight.

Big insurers American International Group Inc. and Prudential Financial Inc., and General Electric Co.'s finance arm GE Capital, said they are among the firms. The near-collapse of AIG in 2008 helped trigger the financial crisis and it received a $182 billion federal bailout that it has since repaid.

94. Reacting to Fed dread -

In an otherwise exceptionally dull trading week, markets worldwide reacted violently last Wednesday to Ben Bernanke’s mixed congressional testimony and the Fed meeting minutes released later in the day. Why so skittish?

95. US consumer confidence rises in May to 5-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans' confidence in the economy jumped in May to a five-year high, lifted by a better outlook for hiring, rising home prices and more optimism about business conditions. The increase suggests consumers may keep boosting economic growth this year.

96. Stocks jump after home prices, confidence surge -

NEW YORK (AP) — A rally that brought the stock market to record highs this year came back to life after U.S. home prices rose the most in seven years and consumer confidence reached a five-year high. As stock prices rose investors sold bonds, sending interest rates higher.

97. Will we sell in May this spring? -

The “Sell in May, and Go Away” slogan is common vernacular within the investment sphere. However, for some of our readers who might not be as familiar with this phrase, we will use this week’s writings to review.

98. Jamie Dimon under pressure ahead of investor vote -

NEW YORK (AP) — Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of the country's biggest bank, faces a key test this week: His shareholders are voting on whether to let him keep both jobs.

It's been just more than a year since his bank, JPMorgan Chase, revealed a surprise trading loss that tarnished its usually stellar reputation in Washington and on Wall Street, and what a difference it has made. Shareholder groups are calling for the bank to strip him of his chairman job, a move that would be a bruising referendum against a man who's normally chieftain even among other big-bank CEOs. They're also lobbying to kick out multiple long-time board members, saying they should have done more to detect or prevent the trading loss.

99. CFTC adopts weakened rule on derivatives trading -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A rule intended to loosen the largest U.S. banks' control over the trading of complex investments and help safeguard the financial system was weakened Thursday by regulators.

Critics say the changes will allow major Wall Street banks to continue to dominate the $700 trillion derivatives market.

100. LinkedIn looks to build on its impressive resume -

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) — LinkedIn and Facebook will celebrate the anniversaries of their IPOs just a few days apart this week. But their experiences as publicly traded companies couldn't be more different.