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Editorial Results (free)

1. Survey: Americans' pessimism on economy has grown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans are more anxious about the economy now than they were right after the Great Recession ended despite stock market gains, falling unemployment and growth moving closer to full health.

2. Stocks end higher following strong run in August -

The Standard & Poor's 500 index delivered its fourth record high in five days Friday, ending with the biggest monthly gain since February.

The milestone-crushing run capped a week when the S&P eclipsed the 2,000-point mark for the first time. And the index ended August with a gain of 3.8 percent.

3. It’s the pits choosing between these olive varieties -

My 2-year-old grandson, Landon, loves olives and pickles, which he calls “ahwives” and “bickles.”

And, no, they aren’t the best thing for him, but what’s a grandmother to do when he’s holding up his chubby little hand begging for “ahwives?”

4. Getting to the bottom of comic strip’s mistake -

In the statewide daily I read each morning, the Aug. 13, 2014 “Judge Parker” comic strip featured legal secretary Gloria saying to senior partner Sam, “Rocky Ledge is talking about having Steve come aboard as corporate council” (sic).

5. Minimizing jargon might help you land that job -

Recently, my doctor explained a topic so complicated that even my two advanced degrees weren’t helping to decipher what she was talking about.

“If we were talking about marketing, I’d completely understand,” I said. “But, unfortunately I don’t. Can you explain this to me again in a more simple way?” My doctor paused, laughed, and said, “You know, this is how I feel when my pest guy comes to tell me about my lawn. I have no idea what he’s talking about!”

6. Not too late to make Labor Day/late summer getaway -

Labor Day, the traditional end to summer. Public swimming pools are closing and college football is underway.

It’s also time for one last getaway before fall settles in, especially if you have school-age children.

7. Author navigates his way out of Glass Closet -

The view from your office is quite magnificent.

When you moved into that space, you also got the perfect desk, a credenza to match and a plushy, throne-like chair. It’s a workspace anyone would envy.

8. Ice Bucket Challenge spotlights power of viral video -

Perhaps one of the greatest viral phenomena – the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge – has dominated social media channels for the past month, raising an impressive $70 million to date, compared to $2.5 million typically raised by the nonprofit during the same time period.

9. Applications for US unemployment aid slip to 298K -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits slipped 1,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 298,000, a low level that signals employers are cutting few jobs and hiring is likely to remain strong.

10. Deliveries roll following deal in supermarket feud -

TEWKSBURY, Mass. (AP) — A six-week standoff between thousands of employees of a New England supermarket chain and management has ended with the news that the beloved former CEO is back in control after buying the entire company.

11. Tennessee tea party supporters take heart from vote -

NASHVILLE (AP) - For U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, the elder statesman of Tennessee politics, a primary challenge by a little-known tea party opponent was supposed to be little more than a glorified victory lap around the state.

12. 3 ways insurers can discourage sick from enrolling -

Insurers can no longer reject customers with expensive medical conditions thanks to the health care overhaul. But consumer advocates warn that companies are still using wiggle room to discourage the sickest — and costliest — patients from enrolling.

13. Events -

Gulch Beer Fest. Featuring 40 southern craft beer brewers and over 100 different types of beer. For the price of your ticket you can enjoy unlimited samples of beer, music, food trucks and local vendors. Saturday, 12-6 p.m. Tickets: $50-$100. Information: www.gulchbeerfest.com/

14. Freshman orientation: Vols among NCAA’s youngest headed into Sunday opener -

KNOXVILLE – For better or worse, University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones won’t need to wait long to see the talent level of his highly touted freshman class.

Jones will find out Sunday night at 7 when the Vols play host to Utah State at Neyland Stadium. The Aggies will be an underdog – probably by a touchdown or so – and a trendy pick for some as an upset special.

15. Veteran Titan gives human face to ALS awareness -

A year ago, Tim Shaw was trying to hang on to his roster spot with the Tennessee Titans.

Now, at age 30, Shaw revealed last week that he is suffering from ALS, commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

16. Is it really time to relax lending standards? -

Just when you thought it was safe to believe in the wisdom of the system, they pull this.

Back in 2008, when the Great Recession made its way into Middle Tennessee and the area began to feel the pain that other regions had endured for several years, the financial world collapsed.

17. Developers swing, miss in attempt to buy prime Germantown locale -

The first time I stepped into this mustard-yellow building at 300 Jefferson Street to ask how it felt to have the Nashville Sounds moving in across the street, Wayne Woelk, 50, was having a heart attack.

18. A more earth-friendly burial option now available -

When Dara Ashworth’s father died this spring after battling metastatic melanoma, she and her two sisters struggled with the best way to honor his life, his memory and his body.

Their father, Leonard Daniel Hamby, 64, a lab technician with the Tennessee Department of Health, didn’t have a specific plan, but the family knew enough about his wishes and knew that he didn’t want a traditional burial.

19. Embracing cremation: High cost of funerals drives search for end-of-life alternatives -

As business decisions go, this was a tricky one.

Jeff and Steve Murphy, owners of Music City Mortuary, opened their Nashville business in 2001, catering primarily to the needs of other funeral directors, providing transportation, embalming and preparation services, shipping – everything a mortuary business provides.

20. Time Warner Cable says outages largely resolved -

NEW YORK (AP) — Time Warner Cable said Wednesday service was largely restored after a problem that occurred during routine maintenance caused a nationwide outage of its Internet service for hours.

21. Stocks drift higher; S&P 500 holds on to 2,000 -

Even in a daylong sideways drift, the Standard & Poor's 500 index managed to eke out its third record close in three days.

U.S. stocks ended essentially flat on Wednesday after spending much of the day wavering between tiny gains and losses.

22. 10 things to know about corporate inversions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Burger King is drawing a lot of flak over plans to shift its legal address to a foreign country by merging with Tim Hortons, the Canadian coffee-and-doughnut chain.

The transaction is called a corporate inversion, a maneuver that is becoming popular among companies looking to lower their tax bills.

23. AP survey: Fed's outlook correct but not solution -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Economists appear to be of two minds about the Federal Reserve.

They agree with the Fed that the job market still isn't healthy. Yet the latest Associated Press survey of economists finds that most fear the Fed will wait too long to raise interest rates and thereby risk stoking inflation or creating asset bubbles.

24. Survey: US consumer confidence near a 7-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer confidence this month reached its highest point in nearly seven years, boosted by strong job gains.

The Conference Board said Tuesday that its confidence index rose for a fourth straight month to 92.4 from 90.3 in July. The August reading is the highest since October 2007, two months before the Great Recession officially began.

25. Another milestone: S&P 500 closes above 2,000 -

It was a big round-number day for the stock market.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index closed a hair above 2,000 points Tuesday, 16 years after it closed above 1,000 points for the first time.

26. Even if attacked, airline could be liable in crash -

Families of passengers who were on the Malaysia Airlines plane shot down over Ukraine are starting to sort through the long process of gaining compensation for their loss.

Officials in the Netherlands, where the majority of Flight 17 victims lived, say that Malaysia Airlines has been making $50,000 payments to the families without admitting any wrongdoing in the crash.

27. Is it fantasy football or online gambling? -

Some of the newest incarnations of fantasy football look a lot more like gambling than intricate, outsmart-your-opponent strategy games.

Since 2011, the billion-dollar fantasy market has been infused with dozens of daily and weekly games. Those games allow players to win huge prizes quickly, sometimes in one week, sometimes in just one night. With players betting thousands or even tens of thousands a night, legal experts believe it's time to review the section of the 2006 federal law that was written specifically to protect fantasy sports from being banned the way online poker was.

28. Sales of US new homes fall in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fewer Americans bought new homes in July, evidence that the housing sector is struggling to gain traction more than five years into the economic recovery.

The Commerce Department said Monday that new-home sales fell 2.4 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 412,000. The report also revised up the June sales rate to 422,000 from 406,000.

29. Tracy concedes to US Rep. DesJarlais -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The Republican state senator who challenged scandal-plagued U.S. Rep. Scott DesJarlais conceded his 38-vote primary loss to the incumbent on Monday, saying he decided not to challenge the results.

30. Tax refunds may get hit due to health law credits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Taxes? Who wants to think about taxes around Labor Day?

But if you count on your tax refund and you're one of the millions getting tax credits to help pay health insurance premiums under President Barack Obama's law, it's not too early.

31. Study: House calls for frail elders bring savings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ten or 12 times a year, Beatrice Adams' daughter would race her frail mother to the emergency room for high blood pressure or pain from a list of chronic illnesses.

32. S&P 500 touches 2,000 points as deals continue -

Summer doldrums? Not on Wall Street. The stock market notched another first on Monday as the Standard & Poor's 500 index nudged briefly past the 2,000-point mark and closed with its second record high in a week.

33. Survey: Economists say Fed is on 'the right track' -

NEW YORK (AP) — A majority of economists believe the Federal Reserve is doing the right things to help repair the U.S. economy, according to a survey released Monday by the National Association of Business Economists.

34. Survey: US gas prices down 4 cents per gallon -

CAMARILLO, Calif. (AP) — The average U.S. price of gasoline has dipped 4 cents per gallon in the past two weeks, and prices in California have fallen 5 cents in the same time period.

According to the Lundberg Survey released Sunday, the average nationwide price for a gallon of regular is now $3.48 — 8 cents below what it was a year ago. The average price for midgrade gasoline is $3.69, and premium is $3.84.

35. Lawsuits challenge FAA drone, model aircraft rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Model aircraft hobbyists, research universities and commercial drone interests filed lawsuits Friday challenging a government directive that they say imposes tough new limits on the use of model aircraft and broadens the agency's ban on commercial drone flights.

36. At Jackson Hole, central bankers eye varying goals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The central bankers meeting this week at their annual conference in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, aren't exactly in sync. Many are taking steps that clash with the policies of others.

37. Yellen: Job market makes Fed hesitant on rate hike -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) — If anyone thought Janet Yellen might clarify her view of the U.S. job market in her speech here Friday, the Federal Reserve chair had a message:

The picture is still hazy.

38. Yellen speech awaited for any hint on rate timing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two days after the Federal Reserve revealed an intensifying internal debate over interest rates, Chair Janet Yellen will address the annual Fed conference in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, with investors seeking any clear hints of when it will start raising rates.

39. US diplomats barred from ice bucket challenge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The charity stunt has lured athletes, celebrities, politicians and rock stars and gone viral on the Internet, but don't look for U.S. diplomats to get in on the fun.

Lawyers at the State Department have banned American ambassadors and other high-profile foreign service officers from participating in the ice-bucket challenge to raise money and awareness for Lou Gehrig's disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. In a cable sent this week to all U.S. diplomatic missions, the lawyers say it runs afoul of federal ethics rules barring officials from using public office for private gain "no matter how worthy the cause." The unclassified cable, sent on Tuesday, was obtained by The Associated Press Thursday.

40. US housing recovery appears to be back on track -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A fourth straight monthly increase in sales of existing homes provided the latest evidence Thursday that the U.S. housing market is rebounding from a weak start to the year.

41. Family Dollar rejects Dollar General offer -

Family Dollar has rejected a takeover bid from dollar-store competitor Dollar General, saying it would be too hard for the deal to pass antitrust regulators. Family Dollar's board said it supports its existing deal to be acquired by Dollar Tree.

42. Family Dollar rejects Dollar General offer -

MATTHEWS, N.C. (AP) — Family Dollar is rebuffing Dollar General's takeover bid, citing antitrust issues. The discounter's board supports its existing merger with Dollar Tree.

Family Dollar Stores Inc. Chairman and CEO Howard Levine said in a statement Thursday that its board and advisers reviewed Dollar General Corp.'s offer and determined it wasn't reasonably likely to be completed on the terms proposed.

43. Social media pushes back at militant propaganda -

BEIRUT (AP) — The extremists of the Islamic State group have turned their social media into a theater of horror, broadcasting a stomach-turning stream of battles, bombings and beheadings to a global audience.

44. Stocks open higher; S&P 500 heading for a record -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are opening higher, pushing the Standard & Poor's 500 index closer toward another record high.

Traders were encouraged by the latest encouraging sign in the U.S. job market, a decline last week in the number of people applying for unemployment benefits.

45. Some Fed officials favor reduced help for economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some Federal Reserve officials think the U.S. economy is improving fast enough that the Fed will need to act sooner than previously thought to slow the extraordinary support it's been providing through ultra-low interest rates.

46. Ex-museum worker allegedly takes $61K in scheme -

NASHVILLE (AP) - An investigative report from the Tennessee comptroller of the treasury alleges that a former Tennessee State Museum worker took more than $61,000 in taxpayer money.

Investigators determined that the woman, who has not been identified, was a convicted felon on parole for a theft of property of over $60,000.

47. Yellen to give her outlook as Fed honeymoon fades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Janet Yellen has won credit for guiding the Federal Reserve's first six months of transition from the Ben Bernanke era. Bernanke's Fed had steered the U.S. economy through a grave crisis by slashing interest rates and restoring confidence in banks. Yellen has so far carried on his approach with barely a hiccup.

48. Banoffee Pie is a cool, creamy summer dessert -

This past Sunday evening, our church had a special choir program and dinner. This is always an enjoyable time because we get to sit back and listen to the beautiful music the choir has performed during the past year, then eat a wonderful meal afterward.

49. Finally on right track with origin of rail house -

Structures, both residential and commercial – especially restaurants and bars – near train tracks are often dubbed rail houses by artists, architects, developers, entrepreneurs and owners.

50. Interviewing for a new job? Better keep it to yourself -

Can you keep a secret? Benjamin Franklin famously said, “Three can keep a secret, if two of them are dead.” Keeping private information private, especially about your job search, can be a tall order.

51. Interviewing sales staff? Ask these 6 questions -

The new-hire failure rate is astonishing and expensive, and even worse for sales candidates, who can be among the toughest to properly vet.

Leadership IQ tracked 20,000 new hires in a recent study, with 46 percent failing within 18 months.

52. Twitter tries to block images of Foley killing -

AMSTERDAM (AP) — Twitter and some other social media outlets are trying to block the spread of gruesome images of the beheading of journalist James Foley by Islamic State militants, while a movement to deny his killers publicity is also gaining momentum.

53. Apple's stock bounces back to hit a new high -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Apple's stock touched a new high Wednesday, reflecting investors' renewed faith in CEO Tim Cook's ability to outwit the competition and expand the technological hit factory built by the late Steve Jobs.

54. Titans offense finally looking like an NFL product -

Exciting. Now, there’s a word that hasn’t been associated much with the Tennessee Titans in recent years.

But based on the early preseason, Coach Ken Whisenhunt is fielding a Titans team that might actually be worth watching.

55. Looks like 6-6 season, return to bowl game for Vols -

KNOXVILLE – Pull out your 2014 schedules, UT fans.

Fall camp is done, and it’s time to get in game-week mode with the season opener against Utah State fast approaching.

So go to the little box next to each of UT’s opponents on the 2014 schedule and pick the winner.

56. Belmont welcomes largest-ever freshman class -

If you graduated from Belmont 20 years ago, you might not recognize the campus today.

Near ceaseless on-campus construction and a huge spike in enrollment has changed the once-sleepy little school into a major player in Nashville and in national collegiate circles.

57. MTSU’s goal: Students graduating on time -

Tennessee’s higher education funding formula is based largely on retaining students, and Middle Tennessee State University plans to stay focused on student support in 2014.

The university initiated the “Quest for Student Success” in October 2013 in an effort to keep students on track and boost its 52 percent graduation rate to 62 percent by 2020.

58. UT students return to transforming campus -

Colleges and universities, no matter how venerable and historic, were designed to move forward, to be progressive.

New academic disciplines are developed, buildings are replaced and tuition goes up. Coaches come and go.

59. No-fly list rules get changes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is promising to change the way travelers can ask to be removed from its no-fly list of suspected terrorists banned from air travel.

The decision comes after a federal judge's ruling that there was no meaningful way to challenge the designation, a situation deemed unconstitutional. In response, the Justice Department said the U.S. will change the process during the next six months. As of late last summer, about 48,000 people were on the no-fly list.

60. Ballmer steps down from Microsoft board -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is stepping down from the company's board, bringing to a close 34 years with the software giant.

Ballmer says he plans to devote more time to his ownership of the Los Angeles Clippers, civic contributions, teaching and study.

61. Consumer prices edge up 0.1 percent in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer prices rose in July at the slowest pace in five months, held back by a drop in gasoline prices.

Consumer prices edged up a seasonally adjusted 0.1 percent last month, after larger gains of 0.3 percent in June and 0.4 percent in May, the Labor Department reported Tuesday. It was the smallest increase since a similar 0.1 percent rise in February.

62. US home construction jumps 15.7 percent in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home construction rebounded in July, rising to an eight-month high and offering hope that housing has regained momentum after two months of declines.

Construction increased 15.7 percent in July to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.09 million homes, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. That was the fastest pace since November and followed declines of 4 percent in June and 7.4 percent in May.

63. Stocks rise as US home construction rebounds -

NEW YORK (AP) — A summer swoon for the stock market appears to be over for now.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index closed within six points of its all-time high Tuesday, less than two weeks after slumping on concerns about rising tensions in Iraq and Ukraine.

64. Google's pivotal IPO launched a decade of big bets -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google's IPO, a decade ago this week, launched the company on a trajectory that continues to reshape its business and much of the world in its orbit.

And CEO Larry Page is determined to push even further.

65. Government wants to make cars talk to each other -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration said Monday it is taking a first step toward requiring that future cars and light trucks be equipped with technology that enables them to warn each other of potential danger in time to avoid collisions.

66. McDonald's confronts its junk food image -

NEW YORK (AP) — At a dinner McDonald's hosted for reporters and bloggers, waiters served cuisine prepared by celebrity chefs using ingredients from the chain's menu.

A Kung Pao chicken appetizer was made with Chicken McNuggets doused in sweet and sour sauce and garnished with parsley. Slow-cooked beef was served with gnocchi fashioned out of McDonald's french fries and a fruit sauce from its smoothie mix. For dessert, its biscuit mix was used to make a pumpkin spice "biznut," a biscuit-doughnut hybrid.

67. US homebuilder confidence rises in August -

U.S. homebuilders are feeling more confident in their sales prospects headed into next year, a sign that home construction and sales of newly built homes may pick up after stalling this summer.

The National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo builder sentiment index released Monday rose this month to 55, up two points from a revised reading of 53 in July.

68. Bourbon production reaches high point since '70s -

LOUISVILLE, Kentucky (AP) — Kentucky bourbon makers are making a big bet by stashing away their largest stockpiles in more than a generation.

To put it in bartenders' lingo: Distillers are putting up the tab for millions of rounds of bourbon years before they are even ordered. The production poses an inherent risk, but hitting the moment right — a big supply meshing with big demand — could mean a serious payday for companies big and small.

69. Dollar General enters bidding for Family Dollar -

NEW YORK (AP) — The nation's top dollar store chains are betting big that their once-thriving business will make a comeback if they band together.

Dollar General, the nation's largest dollar-store chain, started a bidding war on Monday when it offered approximately $8.95 billion for rival Family Dollar. It was an attempt to trump Dollar Tree, which agreed to acquire Family Dollar for $8.5 billion last month.

70. Why global turmoil hasn't sunk US markets. Yet. -

NEW YORK (AP) — Europe appears on the brink of another recession. Islamic militants have seized Iraqi territory. Russian troops have massed on the Ukraine border, and the resulting sanctions are disrupting trade. An Ebola outbreak in Africa and Israel's war in Gaza are contributing to the gloom.

71. Coca-Cola bets on energy drinks with Monster stake -

ATLANTA (AP) — Coca-Cola is buying a 16.7 percent stake in Monster Beverage for $2.15 billion, with the world's biggest soda maker hoping to benefit from the surging popularity of energy drinks.

The Atlanta-based company said Thursday it will also place two directors on Monster's board as part of the deal.

72. Three-wheeled Elio gets closer to going on sale -

ROYAL OAK, Mich. (AP) — Your next commuter car could have two seats, three wheels and get 84 miles to the gallon.

Elio Motors wants to revolutionize U.S. roads with its tiny car, which is the same length as a Honda Fit but half the weight. With a starting price of $6,800, it's also less than half the cost.

73. Berkshire Hathaway stock tops $200,000 -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The stock price of Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway topped $200,000 for the first time Thursday.

Class A shares of Berkshire jumped past the milestone to an all-time trading high of $201,740 Thursday morning.

74. Taylor Swift to perform on MTV Video Music Awards -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tune-in alert: Taylor Swift is performing at the MTV Video Music Awards.

Swift made the announcement Wednesday night on "The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon." It will be the pop star's fourth time performing on the show.

75. Even in bull market, time is right for defense -

Downturns, while painful, can be very useful for the information they provide.

The S&P 500, representative of U.S. large cap stocks, declined 4 percent between July 24 and Aug. 7, and limiting our data set to this time period produces a couple of interesting observations.

76. Lighter sentences sought for some business crimes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal panel that sets sentencing policy eased penalties this year for potentially tens of thousands of nonviolent drug offenders. Now, defense lawyers and prisoner advocates are pushing for similar treatment for a different category of defendants: swindlers, embezzlers, insider traders and other white-collar criminals.

77. US stocks creep higher following earnings news -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. stock market crept higher Thursday following a mixed batch of corporate news. In Europe, investors brushed aside more worrying news on the economy and nudged markets up.

78. Sentencing changes sought for business crimes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal panel that sets sentencing policy eased penalties this year for potentially tens of thousands of drug dealers. Now, defense lawyers and prisoner advocates are pushing for similar treatment for an arguably less-sympathetic category of defendants: swindlers, embezzlers, insider traders and other white-collar criminals.

79. Rainbow birthdays and cakes -

“What kind of party do you want, Gwynnie?” I asked my 4-year-old granddaughter. “A rainbow party,” she replied.

I then asked what kind of cake did she want? “Ummm, a rainbow cake!” she said with a smile while jumping in the air.

80. Lessons learned from millennials -

Much of the research about employment suggests older workers are waiting longer to retire. This means many seasoned professionals are also still job searching. And, many of those are struggling to find their way.

81. Could email make your cold calling easier? -

Cold calling is a tough business, though a necessity for many companies.

The cost of sales is high, as is sales rep rejection and fatigue.

Imagine if email could significantly improve your engagement rate with otherwise cold prospects.

82. Business Hall of Fame honors HCA’s Bovender -

Jack O. Bovender, Jr. has been named the 2014 Laureate of The Phoenix Club Nashville Business Hall of Fame.

Best known as a longstanding leader of HCA, Bovender’s wide range of volunteer service and community involvement demonstrate that he also is an individual committed to building a strong community, and to ensuring a promising future for Middle Tennessee’s young people.

83. Vols resurrect fond memories of ‘Wide Receiver U’ -

KNOXVILLE – None of the receivers on the University of Tennessee football team were born when the program was dubbed “Wide Receiver U” in the 1980s.

Guys like Tim McGee, Anthony Miller, Alvin Harper and Carl Pickens paved the way for UT to become the premier destination for wide receivers seeking stardom into the 1990s.

84. Season-ending shoulder injury could end McCarthy’s Titans career -

The star-crossed career of Tennessee Titans linebacker Colin McCarthy took another wicked turn with the news that he could miss the entire season with a shoulder injury.

McCarthy suffered the injury in Saturday night’s preseason opener, playing in the third quarter with the Titans third-team defense, hoping to show the new coaching regime that he is still a worthwhile entity, either as an inside linebacker or on special teams.

85. Fight to save Printers Alley a family affair -

“How does it feel to be on your own?” Fritz Hester turns Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone” into a surging blues tune that spills out of the Bourbon Street Blues and Boogie Bar into the thick, cigarette and beer-flavored humidity stifling Printers Alley

86. 'Infill King’ John Brittle has a plan to curb urban sprawl. You might not like it -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

87. Like stocks, junk bonds show investor jitters -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market isn't the only place that's been signaling jitters among investors. The $2.3 trillion market for risky U.S. corporate debt has also been under pressure.

A five-year rally in junk bonds abruptly stalled last month. As with other higher-risk investments, investors have pulled back mainly because they worry about the end of the Federal Reserve's policy of near-zero interest rates. Investors expect the central bank to raise rates sometime next year, and that means the value of bonds currently held in portfolios will fall.

88. US budget deficit running 24.2 percent below 2013 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government ran a lower deficit this July than a year ago, keeping it on course to record the lowest deficit in six years.

The July deficit was $94.6 billion, an improvement of 3.1 percent from a year ago, the Treasury Department reported Tuesday in its monthly budget statement.

89. Court considers if executioners can be named -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A Tennessee appeals court is considering whether 10 death row inmates have the right to know about the drugs that will be used in their executions and whether their lawyers can get the names of the people who will kill them.

90. AIDS activist takes up a new fight: defending FDA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As an AIDS activist in the early 1990s, Gregg Gonsalves traveled to Washington to challenge the Food and Drug Administration.

Gonsalves was part of the confrontational group AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, which staged protests outside the FDA's headquarters, disrupted its public meetings and pressured its leaders into speeding up the approval of experimental drugs for patients dying of AIDS.

91. US Postal Service loses $2B this spring -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Postal Service lost $2 billion this spring despite increasing its volume and charging consumers more money to send mail, officials said Monday.

The loss for the spring quarter, which ended June 30, was significantly higher than the $740 million loss for the same three-month period last year. The agency blamed increases in compensation and benefit costs for the red ink and said it would be unable to make a congressionally mandated payment of $5.7 billion this September for health benefits for future retirees. The loss came despite a 2 percent increase in operating revenue compared to last spring.

92. DesJarlais, Tracy campaigns seek legal counsel -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The campaign of scandal-battered U.S. Rep. Scott DesJarlais said it's consulting with election attorneys in case the incumbent's 35-vote lead over his opponent in the Republican primary is challenged.

93. McDonald's sales hit by China scandal, US weakness -

NEW YORK (AP) — McDonald's says a global sales figure fell 2.5 percent in July, dragged down by persistent weakness in the U.S. and a food safety scare in China.

The world's biggest hamburger chain said Friday the decline included a 3.2 percent drop in the U.S. and a 7.3 percent drop in the unit encompassing Asia, the Middle East and Africa.

94. Oil boom and housing bust alter US spending trends -

WASHINGTON (AP) — North Dakotans, enriched by an oil boom, stepped up their spending at triple the national pace in the three years that followed the Great Recession. In Nevada, smacked hard by the housing bust, consumers barely increased their spending.

95. Russia retaliates on West's sanctions over Ukraine -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia retaliated Thursday for sanctions over the crisis in Ukraine by banning most food imports from the West, dealing a blow to Europe that also takes aim at hurting the U.S., Canada and Australia.

96. Fed survey: 25 pct of households 'just getting by' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A survey by the Federal Reserve shows that a quarter of U.S. households say they're "just getting by" financially.

The Fed issued the first-time report Thursday, describing it as a snapshot of how Americans perceive their financial and economic well-being. The survey of about 4,100 households was conducted from Sept. 17 through Oct. 4, 2013.

97. US airlines running behind schedule so far in 2014 -

More U.S. flights arrived late in June than the month before, continuing a string of poor performances by the nation's airlines.

The government says that in the first six months of the year, the rate of late flights was the highest since 2008 and cancelations were the highest since 2000.

98. Oil boom and housing bust alter US spending trends -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumer spending has soared since the Great Recession ended five years ago in U.S. states with oil and gas drilling booms and has lagged in states hit especially hard by the housing bust.

99. Obama to sign veterans' health care overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Veterans are expected to have an easier time getting government-paid health care from local doctors under a bill that President Barack Obama is set to sign into law Thursday.

The $16.3 billion measure also allows the Veterans Affairs Department to hire thousands of doctors, nurses and other health professionals at the VA's nearly 1,000 hospitals and outpatient clinics nationwide.

100. US stocks edge lower in late morning trading -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks edged lower in late morning trading as investors assessed the latest company earnings and the outlook for the economy. Investors are still troubled by the potential for escalating tensions between Russia and the West over Ukraine.