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1. Will American Airlines bar customers from changing a ticket? -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines is threatening to prohibit customers from making changes to nonrefundable tickets if Congress makes good on a proposal to crack down on unreasonable airline fees.

2. Dow hits another all-time high on mixed day for US stocks -

Wall Street capped a milestone-setting week Friday with a mixed finish for the major U.S. stock indexes and the second all-time high in two days for the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

An afternoon sell-off erased modest gains for the S&P 500 that had the benchmark index on track to eke out its own record high for much of the day.

3. S&P 500 marks longest bull run on mixed day for indexes -

The bull market in U.S. stocks is now the longest on record.

The current bull run on Wall Street became the longest in history on Wednesday at 3,453 days, beating the bull market of the 1990s that ended in the dot-com collapse in 2000.

4. Retailers, airlines lift US stocks higher, extending gains -

Retailers and airlines helped lift U.S. stocks broadly higher Monday, extending the market's gains from last week.

Consumer-focused companies and industrial stocks grabbed most of the gains. Banks and health care stocks also rose. Energy companies climbed along with the price of U.S. crude oil.

5. Airlines, consumer groups ready for fight over proposed bill -

As summer vacationers start to pack up and head home, Congress is considering a sweeping tally of proposals that could affect travelers, from dictating seat size and legroom to rolling back rules that require airlines to advertise the full price of a ticket.

6. Inflation, gas prices, tariffs squeeze consumers -

The price of a can of Coca-Cola? Likely going up. A package of Pampers? That too. Plane tickets? They also may be more expensive. These items and more may cost more in the coming months as people start feeling the effects of higher fuel prices and raw-material costs as well as a range of tariffs.

7. Airlines trim flights, make other tweaks to offset fuel -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are bowing to the pressure of higher fuel prices by culling unprofitable flights while trying to boost revenue by being nicer to customers.

American Airlines said Thursday it will join rivals by growing more slowly during the rest of 2018 than it had originally planned.

8. Songwriters get special week, contest -

Nashville’s storied Bluebird Café lauded the designation of the last full week in February as “Tennessee Songwriters Week,’’ and will help promote it by sponsoring a statewide contest for songwriters.

9. China raises tariffs on US pork, fruit in trade dispute -

BEIJING (AP) — China raised import duties on a $3 billion list of U.S. pork, apples and other products Monday in an escalating dispute with Washington over trade and industrial policy.

The government of President Xi Jinping said it was responding to a U.S. tariff hike on steel and aluminum. But that is just one facet of sprawling tensions with Washington, Europe and Japan over a state-led economic model they complain hampers market access, protects Chinese companies and subsidizes exports in violation of Beijing's free-trade commitments.

10. Trump wildlife protection board has many trophy hunters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new U.S. advisory board created to help rewrite federal rules for importing the heads and hides of African elephants, lions and rhinos is stacked with trophy hunters, including some members with direct ties to President Donald Trump and his family.

11. Surge in airline hiring boosts interest in aspiring pilots -

DALLAS (AP) — Major U.S. airlines are hiring pilots at a rate not seen since before 9/11, and that is encouraging more young people to consider a career in the cockpit.

Hiring is likely to remain brisk for years. Smaller airlines in the U.S. are struggling with a shortage that will continue as they lose pilots to the bigger carriers, which in turn will need to replace thousands of retiring pilots over the next few years.

12. US companies take a stand, raise age to purchase guns -

NEW YORK (AP) — Kroger and L.L. Bean said Thursday they will no longer sell guns to anyone under 21, becoming the third and fourth major retailers this week to put restrictions in place that are stronger than federal laws. The announcements follow those by Dick's Sporting Goods and Walmart, emphasizing the pressure companies are facing to take a stand.

13. AP Exclusive: Transport safety rules sidelined under Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — On a clear, dry June evening in 2015, cars and trucks rolled slowly in a herky-jerky backup ahead of an Interstate 75 construction zone in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Barreling toward them: an 18-ton tractor-trailer going about 80 mph.

14. Bass, Berry & Sims names new practice leadership -

Bass, Berry & Sims PLC has appointed Kevin H. Douglas to serve as chair of the firm’s Corporate & Securities Practice Group.

In this role, Douglas will work closely with firm management and with the more than 100 corporate attorneys and staff across the firm’s four offices to develop goals and implement initiatives for the department that are in line with the firm’s overall strategy.

15. Some Walmart employees get raises, others to lose their jobs -

NEW YORK (AP) — For some Walmart employees, the day brought news of a pay raise. Others learned they were out of a job.

Walmart said Thursday that it is boosting its starting salary for U.S. workers and handing out bonuses. The announcement came as the company also confirmed it is closing dozens of Sam's Club warehouse stores — a move that a union-backed group estimated could cost thousands of jobs.

16. Walmart boosts starting pay to $11 an hour, offers bonuses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart, the world's largest private employer, is boosting its starting salary for U.S. workers to $11 an hour and handing out one-time cash bonuses. The company cited tax legislation that will help it save money, but the moves also reflect the tight labor market in which employers are competing for workers.

17. Screen Wars: The Theaters Fight Back -

Television was going to end the movies. Everyone in the 1950s knew that. Didn’t quite turn out that way – as this weekend’s $45 million opening of “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” demonstrates – but the advent of new forms of entertainment did get movie theater operators thinking about ways to compete for audience share, a trend that has ramped up to new heights 60 years later.

18. NAACP warns against travel on American Airlines -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — The NAACP is warning African-Americans that if they fly on American Airlines they could be subject to discrimination or even unsafe conditions.

American said Wednesday that it was disappointed by the announcement and will invite the civil rights group to meet and talk about the airline.

19. Report: Trump-tied lobbyists cash in on their connections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The day after the presidential election, the Washington lobbying firm Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck touted its Republican team's "significant relationships ... with those who will steer the incoming Trump administration." It highlighted Marc Lampkin, managing partner of its Washington office and a Trump fundraiser.

20. Soaring airline stocks help lift Wall Street to new heights -

NEW YORK (AP) — Airline and automaker stocks took off on Tuesday and helped U.S. indexes push a bit further into record territory. Trading was again quiet overall, with only modest moves for bond yields, commodities and other markets.

21. Travel industry sticking with trips to Cuba from US -

MIAMI (AP) — Tour companies, airlines, cruises and others in the travel industry say they will continue taking Americans to Cuba despite a dramatic safety warning issued Friday by the U.S. State Department.

22. American Airlines CEO: We'll never lose money again -

GRAPEVINE, Texas (AP) — The CEO of American Airlines says the once-volatile industry has changed so radically that his company will never lose money again.

Even in a bad year, Doug Parker says, the world's biggest airline should earn about $3 billion in profit before taxes.

23. Energy leads US stocks indexes to a mostly higher finish -

A listless day on Wall Street finished with U.S. stocks eking out small gains Friday, as strength in energy, phone and industrial companies offset losses elsewhere.

Some health insurers bounced back as support dwindled for the Senate Republicans' latest effort to roll back the Affordable Care Act.

24. Flight cancellations mount as Irma pushes north from Florida -

Big airports in Florida remained closed Monday, and flight cancellations were spreading north along the track of Tropical Storm Irma.

American Airlines said it won't resume flights in Miami until at least Tuesday, revising its plans to restart late Monday.

25. US stocks set records as Irma and North Korea worries fade -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rallied to record highs Monday as Hurricane Irma weakened without causing as much damage as many had feared, and a North Korean holiday passed without new missile launches. Financial and technology companies lead the way.

26. Tech firms lead broad gains for US stocks; new high for Dow -

Technology companies led U.S. stocks higher Wednesday in a broad rally that helped nudge the Dow Jones industrial average to a new high.

In remarks before Congress, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen raised the possibility that the central bank would consider slowing the pace of its interest rate increases if inflation remained persistently below its target level.

27. US stock indexes tick higher as oil's dismal week eases -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes ticked higher in morning trading Thursday after the price of oil stabilized, at least for now.

This week has been dominated by oil's tumbling price, which dropped on Wednesday to its lowest level since last summer, and how much it will affect the broader market.

28. AP FACT CHECK: Whom to believe, Trump or his lawyer? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and one of his personal lawyers have contradicted each other over whether the president is under investigation by the special counsel probing Russians' meddling in the 2016 election and possible links with the Trump campaign.

29. Trump restores some Cuba penalties, rejecting 'oppressors' -

MIAMI (AP) — President Donald Trump declared Friday he was restoring some travel and economic restrictions on Cuba that were lifted as part of the Obama administration's historic easing. He challenged the communist government of Raul Castro to negotiate a better deal for Cubans and Cuban-Americans.

30. Qatar says Kuwait trying to mediate, solve Gulf crisis -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Kuwait is trying to mediate a Gulf crisis between Qatar and its Arab neighbors, which have severed ties with the energy-rich travel hub and moved to isolate it from the outside world, Qatar's foreign minister said Tuesday.

31. Business, leisure travelers ponder flying without laptops -

NEW YORK (AP) — International air travelers might soon rediscover magazines, paperbacks and playing cards.

Airline passengers have become hooked on their laptops and tablets to get work done or just kill time during long flights. But U.S. aviation-security officials appear determined to ban large electronic devices in the cabin of flights from Europe.

32. Intel sharing at heart of US, Europe talks on laptop ban -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The intelligence behind plans to broaden a U.S. ban on in-flight laptops and tablets to include planes from Europe took center stage on Wednesday as American and European officials met to discuss the looming decision.

33. Chaos at Florida airport after Spirit cancels 9 flights -

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Irate passengers swarmed ticket counters and some started a near-riot at Fort Lauderdale's airport after Spirit Airlines canceled nine flights, blaming the decision on pilots' failure to show up.

34. American Airlines brings back free meals on some flights -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines said Tuesday that it plans to offer free meals to everyone in economy on certain cross-country flights starting May 1.

The decision at the world's biggest airline copies Delta Air Lines, which announced a month ago that it would restore free meals in economy on a dozen long-haul U.S. routes this spring.

35. Another drop for oil prices pulls stock indexes lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes sank Tuesday after yet another drop in the price of oil dragged down shares across the energy industry. Other areas of the market saw modest losses as investors wait to hear from the Federal Reserve, which began a two-day policy meeting on interest rates.

36. Losses for banks pull US stocks further from record highs -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks finished lower Monday for the second time in the last three trading days. Banks gave back some of their recent gains after a jump in interest rates last week sent them sharply higher.

37. Banks, health care companies lead stocks slightly higher -

A late wave of buying helped nudge U.S. stock indexes slightly higher Friday after a day of mostly listless trading.

Banks and health care stocks climbed the most as investors priced in an increasing likelihood that interest rates will rise in the coming months.
Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen helped stoke those expectations in a speech in which she said an improving job market and rising inflation would likely prompt the central bank to increase borrowing costs.
"

38. United, after years of declining revenue, hits the thrusters -

DALLAS (AP) — United Airlines, which lost the distinction of being the world's biggest carrier after shrinking for several years, plans to regain lost ground by adding more flights from key airports this summer.

39. United, American begin selling cheaper economy-class fare -

DALLAS (AP) — American and United have started selling cheaper "basic economy" fares as they battle discount airlines for the most budget-conscious travelers.

American announced early Tuesday that it began selling the new fares for flights starting March 1 on 10 different routes from its hub airports in Dallas, Miami, Philadelphia and Charlotte, North Carolina.

40. Bond yields rise, stocks push to records as economy cruises -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks and bond yields punched higher Wednesday, and U.S. indexes set records again, following more encouraging news on the U.S. economy.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 11.67 points, or 0.5 percent, to 2,349.25. It's the seventh straight gain for the index and its longest winning streak in three and a half years.  The Dow Jones industrial average rose 107.45 points, or 0.5 percent, to 20,611.86. The Nasdaq composite rose 36.87, or 0.6 percent, to 5,819.44. Seven stocks rose on the New York Stock Exchange for every five that fell.

41. The Latest: More Republicans concerned over Trump travel ban -

Growing numbers of Republican lawmakers are expressing concerns about President Donald Trump's executive order cracking down on immigration.

GOP Sens. Marco Rubio of Florida and Tim Scott of South Carolina say in a joint statement that "the manner in which these measures were crafted and implemented have greatly contributed to the confusion, anxiety and uncertainty of the last few days."

42. Airlines increase on-time arrivals, reduce canceled flights -

The chances that your flight will be on time and won't get canceled appear to be looking up.

The federal Department of Transportation reported Tuesday that 86.5 percent of U.S. flights in November arrived on time, an improvement over both the previous month and November 2015.

43. Gov't proposal envisions phone calls on airline flights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Airlines could let passengers make in-flight phone calls using Wi-Fi under a proposal from federal regulators.

Flight attendants and others have complained that the calls could be disruptive. But the Department of Transportation said Thursday that it envisioned allowing the calls if airlines tell all customers about the policy when they buy their tickets.

44. Alaska Airlines gets US approval to buy Virgin America -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Alaska Airlines has won government approval to buy rival Virgin America after agreeing to reduce its flight-selling partnership with American Airlines.

Parent company Alaska Air Group Inc. said Tuesday that it expects to close the $2.6 billion deal soon.

45. US airlines expect Thanksgiving travel to rise 2.5 percent -

The nation's leading airlines are confident they can handle higher Thanksgiving travel this year partly because more people have signed up for quick-screening programs that are designed to keep airport security lines moving.

46. US stocks slip; real estate falls and banks climb -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks dodged bigger losses and finished barely lower on Wednesday. Health care companies fell and Apple pulled technology companies down, but banks rose.

Earlier in the day, stocks had appeared to be headed for a second day of notable losses, but they recovered some of that lost ground in late trading. Weak earnings for major companies hurt real estate investment trusts and health care companies. Tech stocks slid as investors were unimpressed with Apple's latest results. Banks continued to report strong earnings and Boeing boosted industrial companies.

47. US stock indexes mixed in early trading; oil down -

U.S. stocks were little changed in early trading Thursday as investors weighed disappointing quarterly results and forecasts from several big companies. Telecom stocks fell, while health care stocks mostly rose.

48. Tech and consumer companies lead US stocks higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rebounded Tuesday and climbed after a survey showed consumer confidence is at a nine-year high, a sign Americans will keep spending in the months to come. Technology and consumer stocks made the largest gains.

49. Marriott buys Starwood, becoming world's largest hotel chain -

NEW YORK (AP) — Several of the best-known names in travel are now united in one hotel company.

Marriott International closed Friday morning on its $13 billion acquisition of Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, bringing together its Marriott, Courtyard and Ritz Carlton brands with Starwood's Sheraton, Westin, W and St. Regis properties.

50. US stock indexes mixed; Nasdaq ekes out another record high -

Even on a day when the major U.S. stock indexes barely budged, the market notched another milestone.

The Nasdaq composite eked out a gain, pushing the tech-heavy index to its second record-high close in a row. The Dow Jones industrial average and Standard & Poor's 500 index drifted in the opposite direction, closing slightly in the red.

51. American will reward fliers based on dollars, not miles -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines is following other airlines by basing perks like free flights on how much passengers spend on tickets, not how many miles they fly.

The change, which matches those at Delta Air Lines and United Airlines, starts with flights on Aug. 1 and rewards American's highest-paying passengers.

52. The great road trip returns this summer thanks to cheap gas -

NEW YORK (AP) — Grab your sunglasses, a giant cup of coffee and prepare to hit the highway: 2016 is shaping up to be the summer of the road trip.

Cheap fuel prices have left many American families flush with spare cash, which they now plan to spend on vacations. And with summertime gas prices predicted to be the lowest in 13 years, the travel industry is outright giddy over its chances for a blockbuster July and August.

53. The great road trip returns this summer thanks to cheap gas -

NEW YORK (AP) — Grab your sunglasses, a giant cup of coffee and prepare to hit the highway: 2016 is shaping up to be the summer of the road trip.

Cheap fuel prices have left many American families flush with spare cash, which they now plan to spend on vacations. And with summertime gas prices predicted to be the lowest in 13 years, the travel industry is outright giddy over its chances for a blockbuster July and August.

54. US stock indexes end mixed as investors size up earnings -

A rebound in the price of oil and natural gas helped drive sharp gains for energy and financial companies, nudging U.S. stocks mostly higher Friday.

That offset a slide in the technology sector following disappointing earnings from Microsoft, Google parent Alphabet and other big names.

55. Alaska Air buys Virgin America to expand West Coast flights -

NEW YORK (AP) — Alaska Air Group Inc. is buying Virgin America in a deal worth $2.6 billion, making Alaska the biggest carrier on the West Coast and reigniting the debate over airline consolidation.

56. US stocks jump after solid March jobs report -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks climbed Friday after the government said job growth continued at a strong clip in March. Makers of consumer goods and household products rose, and health care companies rebounded. The solid employment report helped U.S. stocks stay out of a steep global decline.

57. US indexes mostly fall; travel companies drop after attacks -

U.S. stock indexes closed mostly lower Tuesday as airlines, cruise companies and travel booking sites fell following the deadly bombings in Belgium.

News of the attacks, which killed at least 31 people, pulled the broader market lower for much of the morning. An early afternoon rally erased some of the losses, but the rebound didn't hold.

58. Airlines restore tiny perks, like pretzels, to pacify fliers -

NEW YORK (AP) — After 15 years of near austerity, U.S. airlines are restoring some small perks for passengers crammed into coach.

Don't expect ample legroom or free checked bags. But fliers will find improved snacks, a larger selection of free movies and — on a few select routes — the return of free meals.

59. Airlines prep for holiday crush: More flights, bigger planes -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are shifting the timing of thousands of flights, even adding dozens of redeyes, as they try to avoid delays while hauling millions of passengers from now through the Christmas weekend.

60. More Thanksgiving travelers; don't get stuck at the airport -

NEW YORK (AP) — A stronger economy and lower gas prices mean Thanksgiving travelers can expect more congested highways this year.

During the long holiday weekend, 46.9 million Americans are expected to go 50 miles or more from home, the highest number since 2007, according to travel agency and car lobbying group AAA. That would be a 0.6 percent increase over last year and the seventh straight year of growth.

61. Marriott becomes world's largest hotelier, buying Starwood for $12.2 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hotel behemoth Marriott International is becoming even larger, taking over rival chain Starwood in a $12.2 billion deal that will catapult it to become the world's largest hotelier by a wide margin.

62. Caputo appointed to American Chamber post -

Christopher M. Caputo of Baker Donelson has been appointed by the American Chamber of Commerce in Italy as the organization’s local representative in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Tennessee.

63. United suffers 2nd major grounding in 2 months -

NEW YORK (AP) — United Airlines temporarily grounded flights across the country for part of Wednesday after experiencing computer problems, causing more than 800 delays.

A White House spokesman said President Barack Obama was briefed on the glitch and that it appeared unrelated to an outage hours later at the New York Stock Exchange.

64. US stocks gain as Greece appears to be willing to negotiate -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hopes that a deal could be reached between Greece and its creditors pushed stocks higher on Wednesday.

The U.S. market opened higher, following strong gains for European stocks, after Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras wrote a letter to the nation's creditors and appeared to make concessions. Greece failed to repay a loan to the International Monetary Fund that was due on Tuesday after talks between the nations and its creditors broke down late last week.

65. Airline group suggests smaller carry-on bags to free up bins -

NEW YORK (AP) — Millions of fliers might soon want to buy new carry-on suitcases.

Global airlines announced Tuesday a new guideline that recommends shrinking carry-on bags, in an effort to free up space in packed overhead bins.

66. US stocks end lower, pushing Dow into the red for the year -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones industrial average slipped into the red for the year on Monday as stocks extended their slump.

Airlines were among the biggest losers amid concern that capacity growth in the industry may curb profitability. JetBlue Airways, American Airlines and Delta Air Lines were among the carriers that declined.

67. Why businesses are speaking out on religious-objections laws -

NEW YORK (AP) — A bevy of big-name businesses including Apple, Gap and Levi Strauss are publicly speaking out against religious-objections legislation in states such as Indiana and Arkansas.

The world's largest retailer and America's largest private employer, Wal-Mart Stores Inc., waded into the debate Tuesday when its CEO urged Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson to veto a bill in Arkansas that critics said would open the door to discrimination against gays and lesbians. On Wednesday Hutchinson called for changes to the bill.

68. Tourists flocking to Cuba 'before the Americans come' -

HAVANA (AP) — Bookings to Cuba jumped 57 percent for one New York tour operator in the weeks after Washington said it would renew ties with Havana. In February, they were up 187 percent; and so far this month, nearly 250 percent.

69. American Airlines tops Street 4Q forecasts -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines is logging record profits and rewarding shareholders just one year removed from bankruptcy court and a big merger.

The airline is getting a huge lift from cheaper fuel — savings could top $5 billion this year — and travel demand that shows no sign of weakening. CEO Doug Parker says 2015 is shaping up as another strong year.

70. US company outlooks worry investors, sending stocks lower -

U.S. stocks slumped Tuesday after some of the market's largest companies reported disappointing earnings, taking investors on a turbulent ride that deepened the losses for the year.

The companies that rattled the market included Microsoft, Caterpillar and Procter & Gamble. Some also forecast weaker results in months ahead.

71. Why cheaper jet fuel won't mean lower airfares anytime soon -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines will save billions this year thanks to cheaper jet fuel, but they aren't likely to share the bounty with passengers — not while so many flights are already full.

Instead, the airlines will use their windfall to pay down debt and reward shareholders.

72. American Airlines, pilots union reach labor deal -

The pilots union at American Airlines has agreed to put up for a vote a five-year contract proposal that would boost pay by more than 26 percent and offer smaller raises in later years.

The board of the Allied Pilots Association agreed late Saturday, just before a midnight deadline set by the company, to accept the basic terms of the deal before the offer was pulled and negotiations moved to arbitration.

73. LGBT-owned businesses get diversity boost -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — As a Mexican-American woman who started her own consulting firm in Los Angeles, accountant Sonia Luna has taken advantage of programs aimed at helping minority- and women-owned businesses compete for government and corporate contracts. But increasingly, the fact that Luna also is a lesbian entrepreneur hasn't hurt either.

74. Top business stories of 2014: US grows, world slows -

NEW YORK (AP) — This year showed how sheltered the U.S. economy is from geopolitical and health crises around the world. The global economy sputtered, but the U.S. powered ahead. Employers are finally hiring enough to lower unemployment. A plunge in gas prices and a rising stock market has Americans feeling richer and spending a bit more.

75. Stocks gain most in more than a year on Fed, oil -

NEW YORK (AP) — A pledge from the Federal Reserve to remain "patient" when deciding when to lift interest rates gave the stock market its biggest gain in more than a year.

Stocks rose from the open on Wednesday, led by gains for the energy sector, as oil prices showed signs of stabilizing after their big slump in recent months. The market's gains were extended after Fed policymakers released a statement following the end of its most recent policy meeting.

76. Why rift on derivatives is blocking US budget bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At the heart of the impasse in Congress over a must-pass spending bill is a provision involving the sorts of high-risk investments that ignited the 2008 financial crisis.

The dispute occurred after Republicans inserted into the bill a provision to relax the regulation of investments known as derivatives. Democrats, led by their House leader, Nancy Pelosi, have demanded that the provision be removed. They argue that it would let big banks gamble with depositors' federally insured money and could make it likelier that banks, if undone by their risky bets, would need another taxpayer bailout.

77. Cost of Thanksgiving is going up, but not by much -

Giving thanks will be a little costlier this year, but — and here's something you can be truly thankful for — it probably won't empty your wallet.

The price for putting Thanksgiving dinner on the table for 10 people is expected to rise slightly this year, clocking in at $49.41. That's 37 cents higher than in 2013. For that, you can blame dairy products, coffee and that all-important marshmallow-topped sweet potato casserole, according to the annual informal survey of consumer grocery prices performed by the American Farm Bureau Federation.

78. American Airlines crew reject union contract -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Flight attendants at American Airlines rejected a five-year contract Sunday, forcing the world's largest carrier and its union for cabin-crew workers into binding arbitration.

Just 16 votes blocked the contract — with 8,180 voting for and 8,196 voting against, the Association of Professional Flight Attendants said in a statement.

79. Get ready for crowded airports this Thanksgiving -

DALLAS (AP) — If you're flying somewhere for Thanksgiving, expect airports to be even more crowded this year.

U.S. airlines expect to carry 24.6 million passengers over the 12 days surrounding Thanksgiving, up 1.5 percent from last year.

80. Oil prices tumble on Saudi discount move -

LONDON (AP) — Oil prices slumped to multi-year lows on Tuesday after Saudi Arabia cut the price of oil sold to the U.S., a move that is shaking an already volatile market but will likely give the world economy an unexpected stimulus.

81. Skip check-in; latest hotel room key is your phone -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hotels don't want guests to have to linger at the front desk — or even stop by at all.

New programs are helping speed up the check-in process for busy travelers, or in at least one case, letting them go straight to their rooms by using their smartphone to unlock doors.

82. Fuel costs ease, US airline profits soar -

DALLAS (AP) — Saving a nickel or a dime per gallon might not seem like much to the average motorist, but for airlines that burn hundreds of millions of gallons of fuel every month, it adds up quickly.

83. US stocks stabilize after a three-day sell-off -

A slump in energy stocks stymied a rebound in U.S. indexes Tuesday as the price of oil plunged the most in two years.

The decline in oil prices followed forecasts for weaker global demand this year and next, a sign of slowing economic growth. Chevron fell 2 percent, helping to drag down the Dow Jones industrial average in the waning moments of trading.

84. US indexes slide; Airlines, energy stocks drop -

The stock market couldn't shake off a case of the jitters from last week and closed sharply lower again on Monday.

Airlines, energy and materials stocks were among the biggest decliners. The market is coming off its biggest weekly decline in more than two years.

85. North Carolina offered $100M for Toyota HQ, twice Texas bid -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina business recruiters offered Toyota more than $100 million in incentives for the world's largest carmaker to move its North American headquarters to Charlotte rather than a Dallas suburb, but still lost out to a Texas offer half that size.

86. Felker to chair Metro Board of Health -

Samuel L. Felker of Baker Donelson has been elected chair of the Metropolitan Board of Health.

A shareholder in the firm’s Nashville office, Felker is a member of Baker Donelson’s Product Liability and Mass Tort Group and a graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law. He has served in leadership positions in the Nashville and American Bar Associations, and he is a member of the Federation of Defense & Corporate Counsel.

87. Stocks decline in afternoon trading; Mattel down -

U.S. financial markets veered lower in afternoon trading Thursday, giving back gains from a day earlier. Economic data were mixed and company earnings reports were mostly disappointing. Investors also monitored developments in Ukraine following reports that a passenger plane was shot down over the eastern part of the country.

88. Hawaiian Airlines keeps top spot in on-time list -

The Associated Press

Here are the government's rankings of the leading airlines and their on-time performance in May. Some airlines, including Spirit and Allegiant, are not included because they operate fewer flights. The federal government counts a flight as on-time if it arrives within 14 minutes of schedule.

89. For airlines not named United, it was a great 1Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Even with the turbulence of severe winter storms and stubbornly high fuel prices, many of the major airlines are cruising and their stock prices are soaring.

Mergers have reduced competition and made it easier for the airlines to limit the supply of seats and raise average fares. Extra fees bring in billions more each year.

90. American, US Airways tweak fees, mileage rules -

DALLAS (AP) — If you use miles to get a free ticket on American Airlines, you may have to pay to check that suitcase.

American and US Airways announced changes Tuesday to their policies on checked-bag fees and redeeming miles for free flights.

91. LGBT travelers offer Middle Tennessee a lucrative demographic -

The secret’s out. Nashville’s a magnet for all who love music, sports, great food and, of course, the ABC hit musical drama that shares the city’s name.

Less known is Music City’s potential to draw even more of a coveted niche group of visitors – lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender travelers.

92. FCC: Lift ban on in-flight calls. DOT: Not so fast -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just because it's safe to use cellphones on a plane, it doesn't mean that passengers should call just to say hello.

That argument played out across Washington Thursday as one government agency moved a step closer to removing its prohibition of in-flight calls while another considered a new ban of its own.

93. Airlines forecast profits to jump to record high -

GENEVA (AP) — The global airline industry expects its profits to jump to a record high next year, helped by falling jet fuel prices, rising travel demand and cost-cutting.

The International Air Transport Association said Thursday it forecasts a profit of $19.7 billion — well above the $12.9 billion expected this year and the $7.4 billion made in 2012.

94. New American Airlines to emerge as deal closes -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines emerged from bankruptcy protection and US Airways culminated its long pursuit of a merger partner as the two completed their deal Monday to create the world's biggest airline.

95. S&P 500 index notches another record close -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market notched another record close Monday after a big acquisition in the food industry. Hope for a longer-term budget deal in Washington also helped.

Food distributor Sysco rose the most in the Standard & Poor's 500 index after the company announced an agreement to buy rival US Foods in an $8.2 billion deal. Sysco's stock jumped $3.31, or 9.7 percent, to $37.62.

96. Judge moves airline merger step closer to takeoff -

A federal bankruptcy judge has cleared the way for American Airlines and US Airways to complete their merger and create the world's largest airline.

The judge ruled Wednesday that this month's settlement of an antitrust lawsuit filed by the federal government didn't upset American's bankruptcy-reorganization plan, which is built around the merger. He rejected a request by a group of consumers to block the deal temporarily.

97. Judge moves airline merger step closer to takeoff -

A federal bankruptcy judge has cleared the way for American Airlines and US Airways to close their merger and create the world's largest airline.

The judge ruled Wednesday that this month's settlement of an antitrust lawsuit filed by the federal government didn't upset American's bankruptcy-reorganization plan, which is built around the merger. He rejected a request by a group of consumers to block the deal temporarily.

98. Govt in agreement to allow American merger -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines and US Airways reached a deal with the government that lets the two form the world's biggest airline and opens up more room at key U.S. airports for low-cost carriers.

99. FAA OKs air passengers using gadgets on planes; calls still prohibited -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Airline passengers will be able to use their electronic devices gate-to-gate to read, work, play games, watch movies and listen to music — but not talk on their cellphones — under much-anticipated new guidelines issued Thursday by the Federal Aviation Administration.

100. US seeks to delay airline-merger trial until March -

DALLAS (AP) — The U.S. government wants to wait until March for a trial on its lawsuit aimed at blocking the merger of American Airlines and US Airways, a deal that would create the world's biggest airline.