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Editorial Results (free)

1. Some GOP lawmakers critical of relief program for farmers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration says it will provide $12 billion in emergency relief to ease the pain of American farmers slammed by President Donald Trump's escalating trade disputes with China and other countries.

2. Trump rattles NATO, knocking its value, assailing Germany -

BRUSSELS (AP) — Under fire for his warm embrace of Russia's Vladimir Putin, President Donald Trump jolted the NATO summit Wednesday by turning a spotlight on Germany's ties to Russia and openly questioning the value of the military alliance that has defined American foreign policy for decades.

3. Trump claims Germany 'controlled' by Russia, Merkel differs -

BRUSSELS (AP) — President Donald Trump barreled into a NATO summit Wednesday with claims that a natural gas pipeline deal has left Germany "totally controlled" and "captive to Russia" as he lobbed fresh complaints about allies' "delinquent" defense spending during the opening of what was expected to be a fraught two-day meeting.

4. Iran deal comparisons cloud Trump's North Korea summit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's triumphant assertions about the success of the unprecedented Singapore summit are being met with skepticism and outright derision from critics seizing on the contradiction between his withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal and his willingness to accept vague pledges from North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

5. Trump cancels summit, citing 'open hostility' by North Korea -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a dramatic diplomatic turn, President Donald Trump on Thursday called off next month's summit with North Korea's Kim Jong Un, calling the cancellation a "tremendous setback" for peace and stressing that the US military was ready to respond to any "foolish or reckless acts" by the North.

6. Trump cancels summit, citing 'open hostility' by North Korea -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a dramatic diplomatic turn, President Donald Trump on Thursday canceled next month's summit with North Korea's Kim Jong Un, citing the "tremendous anger and open hostility" in a recent statement by the North.

7. Pompeo facing rare opposition from Senate panel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee for secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, is facing serious opposition before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, which may not have enough votes to recommend him for confirmation because all Democrats, and at least one Republican, have said they will oppose him.

8. Why Trump's effort to curb immigration could hurt US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's 21st century job market increasingly demands high-tech skills and knowledge. Yet consider this: Nearly half the new jobs the government foresees emerging by 2026 will require only a high school diploma — or none at all.

9. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for January 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, January 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

10. Congress takes on immigration issue amid election pressures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate begins a rare, open-ended debate on immigration and the fate of the "Dreamer" immigrants on Monday, and Republican senators say they'll introduce President Donald Trump's plan. Though his proposal has no chance of passage, Trump may be the most influential voice in the conversation.

11. Trump immigration plan draws criticism from top Senate Dem -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's top Democrat dismissed President Donald Trump's immigration proposal as a "wish list" for hard-liners on Friday as the plan drew harsh reviews from Democrats and some conservatives.
Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., expressed satisfaction that Trump had provided some clarity to his immigration goals, which have befuddled members of both parties and hindered progress in Congress. The White House plan unveiled Thursday offers a pathway to citizenship for 1.8 million young immigrants living in the U.S. illegally in exchange for new restrictions on legal immigration and $25 billion in border security.
Schumer expressed relief that Trump "finally acknowledged that the Dreamers should be allowed to stay here and become citizens," a reference to those young immigrants. But he said Trump's plan "flies in the face of what most Americans believe" and called the proposal "the wish list that anti-immigration hardliners have advocated for for years."
The White House proposal was labeled "Trump Amnesty Disaster" in an email distributed by conservative figure Richard Viguerie, who wrote that the numbers of immigrants it would allow in the U.S. "will make Republicans a permanent minority party."
Senior White House officials cast the plan as a centrist compromise that could win support from both parties and enough votes to pass the Senate. But it comes with a long list of concessions that many Democrats, and also conservative Republicans, especially in the House, may find impossible to swallow.
The plan would provide a pathway to citizenship for the roughly 690,000 younger immigrants protected from deportation by the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — as well as hundreds of thousands of others who independent estimates say qualify for the program, but never applied.
Trump announced last year that he was doing away with the program, but he gave Congress until March to come up with a legislative fix.
The plan would not allow parents of those immigrants to seek lawful status, the officials said.
In exchange, Trump's plan would dramatically overhaul the legal immigration system. Immigrants would only be allowed to sponsor their spouses and underage children to join them in the U.S., and not their parents, adult children or siblings. The officials said it would only end new applications for visas, allowing those already in the pipeline to be processed. Still, immigration activists said the move could cut legal immigration in half.
It would also end a visa lottery aimed at diversity, which drew Trump's attention after the New York City truck attack last year, redirecting the allotment to bringing down the existing backlog in visa applications.
The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the plan before its release.
Under the plan, recipients could have their legal status revoked due to criminal behavior or national security threats, the officials said, and eventual citizenship would require still-unspecified work and education requirements — and a finding that the immigrants are of "good moral character."
The nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute said it believes the largest share of the White House's 1.8 million people who'd be eligible for citizenship — 1.3 million — are people who currently meet all of DACA's eligibility requirements. These include years in the U.S., their ages now and when they entered this country, and whether they have a high school or equivalent education.
Another 400,000 are people who'd be eligible for DACA protection but for their education. And 100,000 more are people who are under age 15 —the minimum age allowed for most people requesting protection under the program.
Trump ended the DACA program in September, setting a March 5 deadline for Congress to provide legal protections or the program's recipients would once again be subject to deportation. The officials said Trump would only sign legislation providing those protections if the other immigration changes he is proposing are implemented.
Trump earlier this month had deferred to a bipartisan group of lawmakers in the House and Senate to craft an immigration proposal, saying he would sign whatever they passed. But as talks on Capitol Hill broke down — in part because of controversy Trump ginned up using vulgar language to describe African countries — the White House decided to offer its own framework.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and others had also complained the president had failed to sufficiently lay out his priorities, leaving them guessing about what he might be willing to sign. One official said the Thursday release represents a plan for the Senate, with the administration expecting a different bill to pass the House.
McConnell thanked the president and his aides for providing the outline. "I am hopeful that as discussions continue in the Senate on the subject of immigration, Members on both sides of the aisle will look to this framework for guidance as they work towards an agreement," he said in a statement.
Doug Andres, a spokesman for House Speaker Paul Ryan, echoed the sentiment saying: "We're grateful for the president showing leadership on this issue and believe his ideas will help us ultimately reach a balanced solution."
Rep. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., an immigration hard-liner, called Trump's plan "generous and humane, while also being responsible" and said he'd work toward its passage. He said that besides protecting DACA recipients, "It also will prevent us from ending up back here in five years by securing the border and putting an end to extended-family chain migration."
But some of Congress' more conservative members seemed unwilling to open the citizenship door for the Dreamers.
"DACA itself didn't have a pathway to citizenship," said Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, who battled Trump in 2016 for the GOP presidential nomination. "So I think it would be a profound mistake and not consistent with the promises we made to the voters to enact a pathway to citizenship to DACA recipients or to others who are here illegally."
Democrats were also raging. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., blasted the plan as "part of the Trump Administration's unmistakable campaign to make America white again."
Democratic Whip Dick Durbin, D-Ill., urged Republicans to join together with Democrats to reach a bipartisan alternative.
"Dreamers should not be held hostage to President Trump's crusade to tear families apart and waste billions of American tax dollars on an ineffective wall," he said in a statement.
Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M., who chairs the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said the White House was using DACA recipients "as bargaining chips for sweeping anti-immigrant policies."
___
Follow Colvin, Miller and Fram on Twitter at https://twitter.com/colvinj, https://twitter.com/ZekeJMiller and https://twitter.com/asfram

...

12. Middle Tennessee's $1M-plus residential transactions for 2017 -

There were 735 homes selling for $1 million or more in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner and Wilson counties in 2017, according to Chandler Reports.

Davidson County had the most with 386, followed by Williamson (316), Sumner (21), Wilson (10) and Rutherford (2).

13. Trump accuses Democrat of undermining trust on immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump turned his Twitter torment on the Democrat in the room where immigration talks with lawmakers took a famously coarse turn, saying Sen. Dick Durbin misrepresented what he had said about African nations and Haiti and, in the process, undermined the trust needed to make a deal.

14. Trump's immigration remarks lambasted from left and right -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Friday denied using certain "language" during a private meeting with lawmakers as fury spread over his comments about immigrants. But neither he nor the White House disputed the most controversial of his remarks: using the word "shithole" to describe Africa nations and saying he would prefer immigrants from countries like Norway instead.

15. Senate GOP insisting on Obamacare repeal for tax overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans said Tuesday they are intent on repealing the Obama health care law requirement that Americans get health insurance, targeting the provision as a way to pay for GOP legislation cutting corporate taxes and individual rates.

16. GOP senator says fate of 'dreamers' must wait for next year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and Republican senators agree that the fate of tens of thousands of young immigrants in the U.S. illegally will be decided next year.

That's the word from Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton, who joined other lawmakers at a White House meeting on Thursday. Cotton says they agreed the must-pass, year-end spending bill in December won't include protections for young immigrants.

17. House GOP set to unveil tax overhaul; keeps retirement rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans are set to unveil their far-reaching tax overhaul Thursday, making major changes yet looking to preserve current tax rules for retirement accounts popular with middle-class Americans and to retain a top income-tax rate for million-dollar earners.

18. House GOP to keep income tax rate for wealthiest earners -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Furiously working to finish a tax bill, House Republicans have decided to keep the income tax rate for the wealthiest earners in the face of Democratic criticism that the overhaul pushed by President Donald Trump would benefit the rich.

19. GOP Sen. Corker announces he won't seek re-election -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, the chairman of the powerful Foreign Relations Committee and a political force on financial issues, announced Tuesday he would not seek re-election.

20. AP FACT CHECK: Trump immigration pitch on shaky ground -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's endorsement of legislation to restrict and reshape legal immigration is based on some shaky assumptions, such as the idea that low-wage green-card holders are flooding in to take jobs from Americans.

21. Trump backs GOP plan to push legal immigration changes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday embraced legislation from two Republican senators that would place new limits on legal immigration and seek to create a system based more on merit and skills than family ties.

22. Top Midstate commercial transactions for second quarter 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, second quarter 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

23. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for June 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, June 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

24. Trump says new health care law will be 'kind' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is having lunch with Republican senators to discuss the repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act.

Trump said President Barack Obama's health care law "had been broken and it's been a broken promise." He said a replacement will be "generous, kind" and show "heart" and promised more funding.

25. Health care fight shifts to Senate, where GOP wants a reboot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It took plenty of blood, sweat and tears for Republican leaders to finally push their health care bill through the House last week. Don't expect the process to be less complicated in the Senate, though more of the angst in that more decorous chamber will likely be behind closed doors.

26. Trump to GOP: Pass health care bill or seal your fate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Time for talk running out, President Donald Trump on Tuesday warned wavering House Republicans that their jobs were on the line in next year's elections if they failed to back a GOP bill that would overhaul Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act.

27. Price prods GOP to 'collaborate' on health care overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Health secretary Tom Price prodded divided Republicans on Friday to "get together and collaborate" on a health care overhaul as GOP leaders hoped to push the legislation through the House next week.

28. Critics of GOP health bill get ammunition from budget score -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Critics of GOP health care legislation got fresh ammunition from a report that estimates the bill would increase the ranks of the uninsured by 14 million people next year alone, and 24 million over a decade.

29. Republicans set low expectations for health bill cost study -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans pushing a plan to dismantle Barack Obama's health care law are bracing for a Congressional Budget Office analysis widely expected to conclude that fewer Americans will have health coverage under the proposal, despite President Donald Trump's promise of "insurance for everybody."

30. GOP leaders claim momentum as health bill clears hurdles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican leaders drove their long-promised legislation to dismantle Barack Obama's health care law over its first big hurdles in the House on Thursday, claiming fresh momentum despite cries of protest from right, left and center.

31. Marathon debate as GOP pushes ahead on health bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Determined House Republicans pushed ahead Thursday with divisive legislation to undo former President Barack Obama's health care law, holding marathon all-night voting sessions in key committees despite Democratic protest and intense opposition from doctors and consumer groups.

32. Marathon debate as GOP pushes ahead on health bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Determined House Republicans pushed ahead Thursday with divisive legislation to undo former President Barack Obama's health care law, holding marathon all-night voting sessions in key committees despite Democratic protest and intense opposition from doctors and consumer groups.

33. Nashville's most romantic restaurants for 2017 -

No matter what romance means to you, Nashville has you covered – and then some. Here’s the list of where to go to celebrate love and some seriously good food.

360 Wine Bar Bistro

6000 Highway 100, 615 353-5604, www.360bistro.com

34. Part 1: Golf game becomes as serious as a heart attack -

I was 50 when I died. April 21, 2002. I can’t forget the date.

A few weeks earlier, I saw an old friend, Cotton, at a memorial service for a mutual friend. Cotton and I had been in the same golf group in the early 1980s.

35. Bradley attorneys elected Tennessee Bar Foundation fellows -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP Nashville partners – William L. Norton, III and Todd Presnell – have been elected as fellows of the Tennessee Bar Foundation, an association of 818 attorneys from across the state.

36. FDA will require e-cigarettes and contents to be reviewed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government announced sweeping new rules Thursday for electronic cigarettes that will for the first time require the devices and their ingredients to be reviewed, a mandate that could offer protection for consumers and upend a multibillion dollar industry that has gone largely unregulated.

37. Nashville's most romantic restaurants for 2016 -

Romance can be found all around, in quiet, 50-seat rooms and bustling of-the-moment hot spots. It’s all about the food, the ambiance, the service and, most importantly, your companion for the evening.

38. Obama begins selling trade agreement to Congress, public -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Negotiations over the complex trade deal took more than five years. On Tuesday, President Barack Obama began what may be a similarly difficult task — selling the Trans-Pacific Partnership to Congress and the American public.

39. Top commercial real estate transactions for first quarter 2015 -

Top commercial real estate transactions, first quarter 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

40. Obama challenges Republicans in State of Union speech -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama says it's time to turn the page after years of economic hardship at home and wars overseas. But Republicans in charge of Congress say the voters already took care of that last November — and they're the proof.

41. Democrats reframe debate on health care -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats is standing by his vote for President Barack Obama's health care law, a fresh sign that the unpopular mandate may be losing some of its political punch.

42. Top Midstate commercial real estate transactions for March 2014 -

Top March 2014 commercial real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

43. Bipartisan budget agreement clears Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress sent President Barack Obama legislation Wednesday scaling back across-the-board cuts on programs ranging from the Pentagon to the national park system, adding a late dusting of bipartisanship to a year more likely to be remembered for a partial government shutdown and near-perpetual gridlock.

44. GOP renews focus on 'Obamacare' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — "Obamacare" escaped unharmed from the government shutdown Republicans hoped would stop it, but just as quickly they have opened a new line of attack — one handed to them by the administration itself.

45. Urban-rural alliance breaks down on farm bill vote -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — For decades, country and city interests had come together every few years to pass the farm bill, a measure that provided billions of dollars in subsidies to farmers and businesses in rural areas and food stamp money for urbanites.

46. Top Midstate commercial real estate transactions for May 2013 -

Top May 2013 commercial real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

47. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for May 2013 -

Top May 2013 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

48. Shoppers face hurdles in finding ethical clothing -

NEW YORK (AP) — You can recycle your waste, grow your own food and drive a fuel-efficient car. But being socially responsible isn't so easy when it comes to the clothes on your back.

Take Jason and Alexandra Lawrence of Lyons, Colo. The couple eat locally grown food that doesn't have to be transported from far-flung states. They fill up their diesel-powered Volkswagen and Dodge pickup with vegetable-based oil. They even bring silverware to a nearby coffeehouse to avoid using the shop's plastic utensils.

49. Late rains, cooler weather save most crops -

NASHVILLE (AP) — With most of the harvest completed in Tennessee, farmers lament the loss of corn, but say timely rains that began in midsummer saved most other crops.

Cotton is expected to finish among the best per-acre yields ever.

50. Top residential real estate transactions for August 2012 -

August 2012 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

51. Cash Business -

Pride flavors John Carter Cash’s voice when talking about the giant shadow his father continues to cast – commercially and culturally – almost nine years after his death and in the year in which he would have turned 80.