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Editorial Results (free)

1. Close Texas loss may not dim O'Rourke's political star -

EL PASO, Texas (AP) — Beto O'Rourke didn't sound like someone giving a farewell speech after losing a Senate race in deep-red Texas by less than 3 points. If anything, his concession to Ted Cruz was a signal that voters could be hearing a lot more from him.

2. Democrats seize House control, but Trump's GOP holds Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats seized the House majority from President Donald Trump's Republican Party on Tuesday in a suburban revolt that threatened what's left of the president's governing agenda. But the GOP gained ground in the Senate and preserved key governorships, beating back a "blue wave" that never fully materialized.

3. What to watch: After turbulent campaign, it's up to voters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tweetstorms and a trade war. Kanye in the Oval Office. Kavanaugh in the hearing room.

President Donald Trump's presidency has been a wild, turbulent, two-year ride. Now it's time for voters to weigh in how much they're enjoying it.

4. Facing uphill battle, Dems lay foundation in GOP stronghold -

FRANKLIN (AP) — Patricia Linder is the kind of undecided voter Democrats are looking for.

The Tennessee retiree lives just outside Nashville in Williamson County, the type of suburban territory where Democrats have made gains in other states since President Donald Trump was elected in 2016. As Democrats around the country push hard to take over the majority of the seats in a Republican-held Congress, they also believe they can lay the groundwork here to have a fighting chance in future races — including 2020, when Trump is expected to seek re-election.

5. Trump faces complaints that new Iran sanctions are too weak -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A battle is brewing between the Trump administration and some of the president's biggest supporters in Congress who are concerned that sanctions to be re-imposed on Iran early next month won't be tough enough.

6. Senate slipping away as Dems fight to preserve blue wave -

NEW YORK (AP) — In the closing stretch of the 2018 campaign, the question is no longer the size of the Democratic wave. It's whether there will be a wave at all.

Top operatives in both political parties concede that Democrats' narrow path to the Senate majority has essentially disappeared, a casualty of surging Republican enthusiasm across GOP strongholds. At the same time, leading Democrats now fear the battle for the House majority will be decided by just a handful of seats.

7. Democrats lead Republicans on fundraising ahead of midterms -

Democrats lead Republicans in the money race in many of the key Senate and House campaigns three weeks ahead of midterm elections that will determine control of Congress.

Although the Senate map positions Republicans to maintain their narrow majority, some of the most vulnerable Democratic incumbents continued to rake in cash in the third quarter of 2018, according to the latest campaign finance disclosures. Among House candidates, the Democrats' campaign arm says that at least 60 Democrats topped $1 million in fundraising during the quarter, with several posting eye-popping hauls in excess of $2 million and even $3 million.

8. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's falsehoods on health plan protections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't playing it straight when it comes to his campaign pledge not to undercut health coverage for people with pre-existing medical conditions.

Five weeks before midterm elections, he is telling voters that those provisions "are safe," even as his Justice Department is arguing in court that those protections in the Affordable Care Act should fall. The short-term health plans Trump often promotes as a bargain alternative to "Obamacare" offer no guarantee of covering pre-existing conditions.

9. Analysis: Trump leans on shaky numbers to shape reality -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of illegal voters. Crowd size. The GDP.

President Donald Trump loves to cite stats and numbers to bolster his political standing. He just doesn't seem to care much about whether they're true.

10. Takeaways from the 2018 primary season -

The stage is set for a November brawl that could loosen President Donald Trump's grip on Washington.

Elections in New York Thursday marked the end of a long, dramatic and sometimes tumultuous primary season that reshaped both parties going into the midterm elections.

11. Day 2 of hearings finds Kavanaugh in the hot seat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh touted the importance of an independent judiciary as his confirmation hearings began with strident Democratic criticism that he would be President Donald Trump's man on the high court.

12. Big oil asks government to protect it from climate change -

PORT ARTHUR, Texas (AP) — As the nation plans new defenses against the more powerful storms and higher tides expected from climate change, one project stands out: an ambitious proposal to build a nearly 60-mile "spine" of concrete seawalls, earthen barriers, floating gates and steel levees on the Texas Gulf Coast.

13. Mystery: Who bought websites implying US senators 'for sale' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dozens of web addresses implying U.S. senators were "for sale" have been quietly and mysteriously purchased online, amid heightened concerns on Capitol Hill that foreign agents — especially Russians — might be trying to meddle in upcoming midterm elections.

14. Congress considers changing supervision of nuclear weapons -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The agency that supervises the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile would essentially lose direct Cabinet oversight under legislation that Congress is negotiating.

The little-noticed provision in a defense policy bill is opposed by the Trump administration and senior lawmakers from both parties, but efforts to scrap it have not overcome resistance from staffers on the Senate Armed Services Committee.

15. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for June 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, June 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

16. Trump weighs 2 or 3 candidates for court, to meet with Pence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The list of contenders to fill a Supreme Court vacancy by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy is narrowing, with President Donald Trump telling reporters that he's focused on two or three people ahead of his Monday announcement.

17. Some lawmakers say they'd like to see one of theirs on court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Donald Trump considers his next Supreme Court pick, some Republicans in Congress want him to consider pulling from their ranks on Capitol Hill.

GOP Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas suggests his conservative ally, Sen. Mike Lee of Utah, would be "the single best choice" Trump could make to fill the vacancy.

18. House GOP struggles with immigration bill ahead of recess -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Struggling to find the votes to pass an immigration overhaul, House Republicans are focusing on a slimmed-down bill to stem the crisis of separating immigrant families at the border.

19. House GOP gets little direction from Trump on immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump told House Republicans he is "1,000 percent" behind their rival immigration bills, providing little clear direction for party leaders searching for a way to defuse the escalating controversy over family separations at the southern border.

20. Trump, GOP to huddle as outrage builds over border policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Calls are mounting on Capitol Hill for the Trump administration to end the separation of families at the southern border ahead of a visit from President Donald Trump to discuss legislation.

21. New swamp: Lobbyist tied to Perry seeks energy firm bailout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At a West Virginia rally on tax cuts, President Donald Trump veered off on a subject that likely puzzled most of his audience.

"Nine of your people just came up to me outside. 'Could you talk about 202?'" he said. "We'll be looking at that 202. You know what a 202 is? We're trying."

22. Georgia Democrat challenges racial barrier in governor race -

ATLANTA (AP) — Georgia Democrats gave Atlanta lawyer Stacey Abrams a chance to become the first black female governor in American history on a primary night that ended well for several women seeking office.

23. EPA security chief also worked for owner of tabloid company -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The security chief for the head of the Environmental Protection Agency worked on the side as a private investigator for the owner of a tabloid news company with close ties to President Donald Trump.

24. CEO Zuckerberg apologizes for Facebook's privacy failures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Under fire for the worst privacy debacle in his company's history, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg batted away often-aggressive questioning from lawmakers who accused him of failing to protect the personal information of millions of Americans from Russians intent on upsetting the U.S. election.

25. House panel says Facebook's Zuckerberg to testify April 11 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify before a House oversight panel on April 11 amid a privacy scandal that has roiled the social media giant, the panel announced Wednesday.

Reps. Greg Walden, R-Ore., and Frank Pallone, D-N.J., said the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing will focus on the Facebook's "use and protection of user data." Announcement of the hearing date comes as Facebook faces scrutiny over its data collection following allegations that the political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica obtained data on tens of millions of Facebook users to try to influence elections. Walden is the committee's Republican chairman and Pallone is the panel's top Democrat.

26. Does Cohn's exit mark end of Trump's Goldman era? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Has President Donald Trump's romance with the Goldman Sachs crowd gone cold?

Top economic adviser Gary Cohn is only the latest Goldman figure to head for the White House exits, suggesting the influence of the oh-so-establishment banking powerhouse has been overwhelmed by the more nationalistic voices in the West Wing.

27. Democrats, women candidates score big in Texas primaries -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Women running for Congress surged to big wins and Democrats smashed recent turnout levels in Texas' first-in-the-nation 2018 primary elections, giving Republicans a potential glimpse of what's ahead in the first midterms under President Donald Trump.

28. Indictment: Social media firms got played by Russian agents -

Friday's election-interference indictment brought by Robert Mueller, the U.S. special counsel, underscores how thoroughly social-media companies like Facebook and Twitter were played by Russian propagandists.

29. Senate leaders predict a tough time getting immigration deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's two top leaders put on a show of comradery as their chamber launched its immigration debate, but also laid down markers underscoring how hard it will be to reach a deal that can move through Congress.

30. Can Trump stick to a script beyond the State of the Union? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — No natural orator, President Donald Trump has nonetheless shown at times that he can deliver a powerful speech that effectively outlines his vision, strikes an emotional chord and moves commentators to declare that he, at last, looks presidential. And then the teleprompter gets turned off.

31. Trump immigration plan draws criticism from top Senate Dem -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's top Democrat dismissed President Donald Trump's immigration proposal as a "wish list" for hard-liners on Friday as the plan drew harsh reviews from Democrats and some conservatives.
Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., expressed satisfaction that Trump had provided some clarity to his immigration goals, which have befuddled members of both parties and hindered progress in Congress. The White House plan unveiled Thursday offers a pathway to citizenship for 1.8 million young immigrants living in the U.S. illegally in exchange for new restrictions on legal immigration and $25 billion in border security.
Schumer expressed relief that Trump "finally acknowledged that the Dreamers should be allowed to stay here and become citizens," a reference to those young immigrants. But he said Trump's plan "flies in the face of what most Americans believe" and called the proposal "the wish list that anti-immigration hardliners have advocated for for years."
The White House proposal was labeled "Trump Amnesty Disaster" in an email distributed by conservative figure Richard Viguerie, who wrote that the numbers of immigrants it would allow in the U.S. "will make Republicans a permanent minority party."
Senior White House officials cast the plan as a centrist compromise that could win support from both parties and enough votes to pass the Senate. But it comes with a long list of concessions that many Democrats, and also conservative Republicans, especially in the House, may find impossible to swallow.
The plan would provide a pathway to citizenship for the roughly 690,000 younger immigrants protected from deportation by the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — as well as hundreds of thousands of others who independent estimates say qualify for the program, but never applied.
Trump announced last year that he was doing away with the program, but he gave Congress until March to come up with a legislative fix.
The plan would not allow parents of those immigrants to seek lawful status, the officials said.
In exchange, Trump's plan would dramatically overhaul the legal immigration system. Immigrants would only be allowed to sponsor their spouses and underage children to join them in the U.S., and not their parents, adult children or siblings. The officials said it would only end new applications for visas, allowing those already in the pipeline to be processed. Still, immigration activists said the move could cut legal immigration in half.
It would also end a visa lottery aimed at diversity, which drew Trump's attention after the New York City truck attack last year, redirecting the allotment to bringing down the existing backlog in visa applications.
The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the plan before its release.
Under the plan, recipients could have their legal status revoked due to criminal behavior or national security threats, the officials said, and eventual citizenship would require still-unspecified work and education requirements — and a finding that the immigrants are of "good moral character."
The nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute said it believes the largest share of the White House's 1.8 million people who'd be eligible for citizenship — 1.3 million — are people who currently meet all of DACA's eligibility requirements. These include years in the U.S., their ages now and when they entered this country, and whether they have a high school or equivalent education.
Another 400,000 are people who'd be eligible for DACA protection but for their education. And 100,000 more are people who are under age 15 —the minimum age allowed for most people requesting protection under the program.
Trump ended the DACA program in September, setting a March 5 deadline for Congress to provide legal protections or the program's recipients would once again be subject to deportation. The officials said Trump would only sign legislation providing those protections if the other immigration changes he is proposing are implemented.
Trump earlier this month had deferred to a bipartisan group of lawmakers in the House and Senate to craft an immigration proposal, saying he would sign whatever they passed. But as talks on Capitol Hill broke down — in part because of controversy Trump ginned up using vulgar language to describe African countries — the White House decided to offer its own framework.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and others had also complained the president had failed to sufficiently lay out his priorities, leaving them guessing about what he might be willing to sign. One official said the Thursday release represents a plan for the Senate, with the administration expecting a different bill to pass the House.
McConnell thanked the president and his aides for providing the outline. "I am hopeful that as discussions continue in the Senate on the subject of immigration, Members on both sides of the aisle will look to this framework for guidance as they work towards an agreement," he said in a statement.
Doug Andres, a spokesman for House Speaker Paul Ryan, echoed the sentiment saying: "We're grateful for the president showing leadership on this issue and believe his ideas will help us ultimately reach a balanced solution."
Rep. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., an immigration hard-liner, called Trump's plan "generous and humane, while also being responsible" and said he'd work toward its passage. He said that besides protecting DACA recipients, "It also will prevent us from ending up back here in five years by securing the border and putting an end to extended-family chain migration."
But some of Congress' more conservative members seemed unwilling to open the citizenship door for the Dreamers.
"DACA itself didn't have a pathway to citizenship," said Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, who battled Trump in 2016 for the GOP presidential nomination. "So I think it would be a profound mistake and not consistent with the promises we made to the voters to enact a pathway to citizenship to DACA recipients or to others who are here illegally."
Democrats were also raging. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., blasted the plan as "part of the Trump Administration's unmistakable campaign to make America white again."
Democratic Whip Dick Durbin, D-Ill., urged Republicans to join together with Democrats to reach a bipartisan alternative.
"Dreamers should not be held hostage to President Trump's crusade to tear families apart and waste billions of American tax dollars on an ineffective wall," he said in a statement.
Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M., who chairs the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said the White House was using DACA recipients "as bargaining chips for sweeping anti-immigrant policies."
___
Follow Colvin, Miller and Fram on Twitter at https://twitter.com/colvinj, https://twitter.com/ZekeJMiller and https://twitter.com/asfram

...

32. Conservatives slam GOP proposal to automatically raise taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Conservative groups and lawmakers are lining up against a proposal by Senate Republicans to impose automatic tax increases on millions of Americans — if their sweeping tax package doesn't grow the economy and raise tax revenues as much as projected.

33. Conservatives slam GOP proposal to automatically raise taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Conservative groups and lawmakers are lining up against a proposal by Senate Republicans to impose automatic tax increases on millions of Americans — if their sweeping tax package doesn't grow the economy and raise tax revenues as much as projected.

34. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for September 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2017, for Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports. Due to technical issues, Davidson County sales are unavailable for September.

35. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for August 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, August 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

36. McConnell: Debate over nation's health care will continue -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The partisan battle over the country's health care system will "certainly continue," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday. But he stopped short of saying whether the chamber will vote on the latest Republican plan repealing the Obama health care law, which seems virtually certain to be rejected.

37. Republican leaders: Senate won't vote on Obamacare repeal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing assured defeat, Republican leaders decided Tuesday not to even hold a vote on the GOP's latest attempt to repeal the Obama health care law, surrendering on their last-gasp effort to deliver on the party's banner campaign promise.

38. What the latest health overhaul push would mean for consumers -

Only one thing is certain for insurance shoppers if the latest attempt to replace former President Barack Obama's health care law succeeds: Uncertainty.

Will you be able to get coverage? How much will it cost? Will it cover my conditions?

39. New blow to GOP health bill: Paul opposes revised measure -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Conservative Sen. Rand Paul remained opposed Monday to the Republican bill repealing the Obama health care law despite fresh revisions, darkening White House and GOP leaders' hopes of staving off defeat in a Senate showdown this week.

40. Republican governors get into the 'news' business -

ATLANTA (AP) — Republican governors are getting into the "news" business. The Republican Governors Association has quietly launched an online publication that looks like a media outlet and is branded as such on social media. The Free Telegraph blares headlines about the virtues of GOP governors, while framing Democrats negatively.

41. Trump appeals to loyalists as support slips, agenda stalls -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is trying to combat new weakness in his Republican base and re-energize his staunchest supporters after months of White House backbiting and legislative failures.

42. GOP seeks support for narrow version of "Obamacare" repeal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Battered by repeated failures to repeal or replace "Obamacare," Senate GOP leaders retreated to a narrow approach Thursday that would undo just a few of the most unpopular elements of Barack Obama's law. Democrats vowed opposition as the Senate prepared for a bizarre Capitol Hill ritual, a "vote-a-rama" on amendments that promised to last into the wee hours of Friday morning.

43. GOP eyes narrow bill to advance goal on "Obamacare" repeal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They couldn't pass a repeal of "Obamacare," or find the votes for a White House-backed replacement. So now Senate Republicans are lowering their sights and trying to unite behind a so-called "skinny repeal" that would merely undo just a few of the most unpopular elements of Barack Obama's law.

44. Top Midstate residential transactions for second quarter 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

45. Vote shows GOP's problems in replacing Obama health law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Where the Senate Republican effort to demolish the Obama health care law ends up is anyone's guess, but early indications are the GOP will have a hard time replacing that statute with any sweeping changes.

46. By a hair, Senate votes to debate GOP health care bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With Vice President Mike Pence breaking a 50-50 tie, the Senate voted by a hair Tuesday to start debating Republican legislation to tear down much of the Obama health care law. The vote gives President Donald Trump and GOP leaders a crucial initial victory but launches a weeklong debate promising an uncertain final outcome.

47. McCain's return sets stage for big Senate health bill vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump urged Republicans to "step up to the plate" for Tuesday's crucial Senate vote on their bill eviscerating much of the Obama health care law. A cliff-hanger roll call was likely, with added drama from Sen. John McCain's return to the Capitol for his first vote since being diagnosed with brain cancer.

48. CBO: GOP health bill adds 22 million uninsured -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A revised Republican health care bill would drive up the number of uninsured Americans by 22 million by 2026, the Congressional Budget Office estimated Thursday in a report unlikely to help GOP leaders persuade their party's senators to back the reeling legislation in an upcoming showdown vote.

49. GOP leaders plan Tuesday health vote, it's an uphill climb -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican leaders pushed toward a Senate vote next Tuesday on resurrecting their nearly flat-lined health care bill. Their uphill drive was further complicated by the ailing GOP Sen. John McCain's potential absence and a dreary report envisioning that the number of uninsured Americans would soar.

50. Health plan hinges on the young, but they're a tough sell -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Julian Senn-Raemont isn't convinced he needs to buy health insurance when he loses coverage under his dad's plan in a couple of years — no matter what happens in the policy debate in Washington, or how cheap the plans are.

51. Analysis: Trump will take health care credit or cast blame -

WASHINGTON (AP) — If congressional Republicans succeed in repealing and replacing the Obama-era health law, expect a big Rose Garden celebration with President Donald Trump taking credit.

If they fail? Trump has already indicated he will hold Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell responsible, setting up an intraparty blame game that could be devastating for the GOP.

52. Trump, administration press Republicans to back health bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From both sides of the Atlantic, President Donald Trump and other administration officials lobbied Republicans Friday to support the Senate GOP's reworked health care bill, with the president saying wavering senators "must come through" to keep the measure from collapsing.

53. New McConnell health bill contains plan sought by Sen. Cruz -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a high-stakes bid for conservative support, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has agreed to demands from Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas to allow insurers to sell low-cost, skimpier plans in new but still-reeling health legislation being released Thursday, two GOP aides said.

54. McConnell rolling out new GOP health bill to uncertain fate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republican leaders are trotting out their new, but reeling, health care bill and angling toward a showdown vote next week amid signs that they have lots of work ahead to win over GOP lawmakers or face a resounding failure.

55. Trump says he'll be 'angry' if Senate health care bill flops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Wednesday he will be "very angry" if the Senate fails to pass a revamped Republican health care bill and said Majority Leader Mitch McConnell must "pull it off," intensifying pressure on party leaders laboring to preserve the teetering measure.

56. Senate consumer choice idea could raise premiums for sick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A health care proposal from Senate conservatives would let insurers sell skimpy policies provided they also offer a comprehensive plan. It's being billed as pro-consumer, allowing freedom of choice and potential savings for many.

57. GOP ready to try pushing new health bill through Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he's ready to unwrap his latest bill repealing much of President Barack Obama's health care law. Another top Republican says the measure will likely keep a pair of tax hikes on wealthier Americans that Obama's statute imposed to help finance its expanded coverage.

58. GOP Senate leader says he'll unveil new health bill Thursday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans will introduce their reworked health care bill Thursday and begin trying to muscle it through the Senate next week, the chamber's GOP leader said Tuesday as the party tried healing divisions threatening to mortally wound the chances for one of its top goals.

59. Grassley 'very pessimistic' about health care bill prospects -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A long-time Republican lawmaker said Tuesday he is "very pessimistic" that his party will push a health care bill through the Senate, even as a colleague warned leaders about retaliation by conservative voters should they react to a collapse of the measure by striking a deal with Democrats.

60. Senate GOP leaders hope for health care vote next week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican leaders are hoping to stage a climactic vote on their health care bill next week, though internal rifts over divisive issues like coverage requirements and Medicaid cuts leave the timing and even the measure's fate in question.

61. GOP leader says he'll rework health bill, but offers Plan B -

GLASGOW, Ky. (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he plans to produce a fresh bill in about a week scuttling and replacing much of President Barack Obama's health care law. But he's also acknowledging a Plan B if that effort continues to flounder.

62. White House: Trump backs repeal-only health bill as 'option' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is pressuring wavering senators to back a Republican bill to repeal and replace former President Barack Obama's health care law but is holding open a repeal-only option if Republicans can't reach agreement over the July 4 recess, Trump's top legislative aide says.

63. GOP may keep Obama tax on wealthy in bid to save health bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Senate Republicans may try preserving a tax boost on high earners enacted by President Barack Obama in a bid to woo party moderates and rescue their sputtering push to repeal his health care overhaul.

64. Little progress evident as GOP hunts health bill votes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is exploring options for salvaging the battered Republican health care bill, even as he confronts an expanding chorus of GOP detractors.

That is deepening the uncertainty over whether the party can resuscitate its promise to repeal President Barack Obama's overhaul.

65. These senators will make or break the GOP's health care push -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's campaign promise to repeal and replace "Obamacare" is now in the hands of a key group of GOP senators who are opposing —or not yet supporting — legislation Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is pushing.

66. GOP leaders add penalty for lapsed coverage to health bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican leaders added a penalty for people who've let their insurance lapse Monday as party leaders prepared to begin pushing their health care measure through the Senate, despite a rebellion within GOP ranks.

67. McConnell's focus: finding votes for Senate health care bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Cheered on by the White House, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is focusing on finding the votes he'll need to push the Republican plan for dismantling President Barack Obama's health care law through the Senate.

68. Senate GOP releases 'Obamacare' overhaul, but not all aboard -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans released their long-awaited bill Thursday to dismantle much of Barack Obama's health care law, proposing to cut Medicaid and erase tax boosts that helped Obama finance his expansion of coverage. The measure encountered immediate trouble as four GOP senators said they opposed it but were open to negotiations.

69. GOP senators complain on eve of health care bill unveiling -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican senators complained about their party's secretive health care bill Wednesday, a day before GOP leaders planned to finally release their plan for erasing much of President Barack Obama's health care law.

70. GOP eyes Senate health care vote next week, amid grumbling -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are angling toward a Senate vote next week on their marquee effort to erase much of President Barack Obama's health care law. But there's plenty of grumbling from senators across the GOP spectrum, and leaders haven't yet nailed down the support they'll need to prevail.

71. Senate steers toward showdown vote next week on health bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans steered toward a potential showdown vote on their long-awaited health care bill next week, despite indications that they've yet to solidify the 50 GOP votes they'll need to avert an embarrassing defeat.

72. Trump seeks to privatize US air traffic control system -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Monday that the nation's air traffic control system needed a modern makeover and urged Congress to approve a privatization plan that he said would increase safety and reduce wait times for passengers.

73. GOP concerns on Trump and Comey pose threat to their agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Several Republican senators are questioning the timing of President Donald Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey. But even as the issue emerges as a potential distraction from the GOP's legislative agenda, most are dismissing Democratic calls for a special counsel, and their hand-wringing looks unlikely to lead to any concrete action.

74. Health care fight shifts to Senate, where GOP wants a reboot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It took plenty of blood, sweat and tears for Republican leaders to finally push their health care bill through the House last week. Don't expect the process to be less complicated in the Senate, though more of the angst in that more decorous chamber will likely be behind closed doors.

75. House repeal of 'Obamacare' hands hot potato to wary Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are claiming a triumph by pushing their legislative centerpiece scuttling much of President Barack Obama's health care law through the House. It was a perilous journey, and its Senate pathway will be at least as bumpy with little doubt the measure will change, assuming it survives.

76. Labor nominee says he won't let politics influence hiring -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee to lead the Labor Department said Wednesday he won't allow potential political pressure from the administration to influence his hiring decisions and regrets he let that happen on his watch at the Justice Department.

77. Price prods GOP to 'collaborate' on health care overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Health secretary Tom Price prodded divided Republicans on Friday to "get together and collaborate" on a health care overhaul as GOP leaders hoped to push the legislation through the House next week.

78. High stakes for Trump on GOP health care bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As a new president who has vowed to keep his campaign promises, Donald Trump knows he'll be judged on whether he can repeal the so-called Obamacare law and replace it with something new.

79. GOP leaders claim momentum as health bill clears hurdles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican leaders drove their long-promised legislation to dismantle Barack Obama's health care law over its first big hurdles in the House on Thursday, claiming fresh momentum despite cries of protest from right, left and center.

80. Conservatives rebel on health care, and GOP looks to Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans confronted a conservative rebellion in their own party Tuesday over their long-promised plans to repeal and replace the health care law, and beseeched President Donald Trump to settle the dispute in his first speech to a joint session of Congress.

81. The fading accuracy of political polling -

Joe Carr says he couldn’t believe the deficit when U.S. Rep. Diane Black trounced him in the August election to recapture Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District seat.

Black, a third-term incumbent, captured 63.6 percent, 33,110 votes, to Carr’s 32 percent, 16,662, in a race he says early polling showed as “very competitive.”

82. Trump's closer is over, Clinton set to snag attention -

CLEVELAND (AP) — In the swirl of balloons and cheers of the masses, Donald Trump finally had his Rocky moment after a rocky convention, and now Democrats are eager to step up for their own spectacle. Hillary Clinton is set to snatch attention from Republicans by naming her running mate in advance of the Democratic convention, with Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine the leading contender.

83. Tennessee delegates have mixed reactions to Cruz non-endorsement -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Tennessee delegates to the Republican National Convention have mixed reactions to a Wednesday speech by Texas Sen. Ted Cruz in which he stopped short of endorsing Donald Trump.

84. GOP House under Speaker Ryan set to blow budget deadline -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans are about to blow through a statutory deadline to pass an annual budget, a major embarrassment for Speaker Paul Ryan that raises questions about his stewardship of the House despite his high profile on the national stage.

85. Tennessee lawmakers lure us in with momentary sanity, and then ... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

86. Math and momentum point to Trump, Clinton nominations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With math and momentum on his side after more big wins, Republican front-runner Donald Trump called on GOP leaders Wednesday to embrace the public's "tremendous fervor" for his candidacy. If GOP leaders try to deny him the nomination at a contested convention when he is leading the delegate count, Trump predicted, "You'd have riots."

87. AP FACT CHECK: Bruised realities in GOP debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican presidential contenders hurled insults again Thursday night but not at each other — rather, at the facts.

Bruises were inflicted on the reality of life for Muslim women, the shape of education standards and the reasoning behind U.S. military and foreign policy.

88. Trump's rivals left with few chances to stop his momentum -

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Donald Trump's easy victories in Michigan, Mississippi and Hawaii left his rivals with shrinking opportunities to slow his momentum in the Republican primaries and little indication that intense efforts to undermine his credibility are pushing voters away from the brash billionaire.

89. Gov. Haslam takes issue with Trump on immigration, abortion -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says Donald Trump would need to make major policy changes before he could consider supporting the front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination.

90. Dissatisfaction drives Tennessee voters -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Tennessee voters supported Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton by large margins, with Clinton doing especially well among older voters and blacks and Trump with voters favoring a non-establishment candidate, according to exit polls conducted by Edison Research for the Associated Press and television networks.

91. Trump, Clinton win presidential primaries in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Republican turnout Tuesday outstripped Democrats by more than 2-to-1 in Tennessee, a show of muscle that encouraged the state's GOP leaders even if they didn't back winner Donald Trump.

92. GOP backers of defense budget hike got millions in donations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans urging a steep increase in the Pentagon's budget have received $10 million in campaign contributions over the course of their congressional careers from defense contractors that would benefit from higher levels of military spending.

93. Obama to raise human rights during historic trip to Cuba -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said Thursday he'll raise human rights issues and other U.S. concerns with Cuban President Raul Castro during a history-making visit to the communist island nation.

94. Obama plans historic trip to Cuba to further ties -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said Thursday his history-making visit to Cuba next month was part of an effort to "improve the lives of the Cuban people. He vowed to press the communist government on human rights and other policy differences.

95. Supreme Court vacancy highlights stakes in presidential race -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The presidential election just got real. The unexpected death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia — and the immediate declaration from Republicans that the next president should nominate his replacement — adds even more weight to the decision voters will make in November's general election.

96. Cruz, Rubio eye NH momentum as Dems gird for long fight -

MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) — A victorious Ted Cruz and buoyant Marco Rubio emerged from Iowa with compelling claims to the outsider and mainstream mantles in the fractured Republican primary, as the presidential race shifted overnight to New Hampshire. Democrats were girding for a protracted slugfest between Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton, locked in a virtual tie.

97. AP FACT CHECK: GOP claims on carpet bombs, Kurds and economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican presidential contenders let fly with some inaccuracies when they badmouthed the Obama administration on health care, military readiness and pay for construction workers in their latest debate.

98. Cornyn a 'peacemaker' as GOP rift on criminal justice widens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A widening Republican rift over revamping the nation's criminal justice system is dashing hopes for overhaul in the final year of President Barack Obama's tenure despite strong bipartisan support and a concerted effort by the second-ranking GOP senator.

99. AP Poll: Public doubts government's problem-solving ability -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the first voting nears in the presidential race, most Americans have little or no confidence in the federal government to confront what they see as the country's most important priorities, according to a national survey.

100. Tennessee Dems want eligibility check on presidential ballot -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Two Tennessee Democrats want to pass a law to require the state to enforce the U.S. Constitution's "natural born citizen" requirement on this November's presidential ballot.

State Sen. Jeff Yarbro and Rep. Jason Powell, both of Nashville, filed the bill on Thursday that would bar the secretary of state from placing the nominee of either party on the ballot if they fail to meet the constitutional eligibility requirements.