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Editorial Results (free)

1. Papadopoulos says he'd testify in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — George Papadopoulos, the former Trump campaign adviser who triggered the Russia investigation, is willing to testify before the Senate intelligence committee, Thomas Breen, his lawyer, said Wednesday.

2. Facebook, Twitter pledge to defend against foreign intrusion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook and Twitter executives assured Congress on Wednesday that they are aggressively working to root out foreign attempts to sow discord in America, and they pledged to better protect their social networks against manipulation during the 2018 midterm elections and beyond.

3. Election security bill backers say delay helps Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just two months before the midterm elections, bipartisan legislation to try to prevent foreign hacking into U.S. election systems is stalled in Congress as the White House and some Republicans worry it could exert too much federal control over the states.

4. Amid harsh criticism, Trump tries a tougher tone on Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump spent a second day managing the political fallout from his widely criticized meeting with Russia's Vladimir Putin, shifting stances and mopping up what the White House said were misstatements.

5. Trump: news media wants confrontation, even war, with Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump accused the news media Thursday of trying to provoke a confrontation with Russia that could lead to war, as he continues to push back against criticism of his summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

6. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's tax 'miracle,' immigration flip-flops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Boasting about his tax cuts, President Donald Trump inflated his role in boosting the economy to mythical proportions, claiming full credit for U.S. growth that was already in the making and ignoring the reality of a mounting deficit. On immigration, he and administration officials repeatedly spread questionable alarms by linking weak border enforcement to pervasive crime and a "surge" in MS-13 gangs.

7. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for May 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, May 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

8. Dem, GOP leaders to get classified briefings on Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House and Senate lawmakers from both parties are set to meet with top intelligence officials Thursday for classified briefings as President Donald Trump raises new suspicions about the federal investigation into his 2016 campaign.

9. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's tweets on Russia probe short on facts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is skimming over the facts involving the investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

In a series of tweets Sunday, he repeatedly assails special counsel Robert Mueller's probe as hopelessly biased, insisting that it is effectively controlled by Democrats. He also repeats a claim that his campaign had been cleared of collusion with Russia.

10. CIA nominee wins Senate panel backing, confirmation expected -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Gina Haspel, President Donald Trump's nominee to head the CIA, won the backing of the Senate intelligence committee on Wednesday, paving the way for her expected confirmation to lead the spy agency.

11. CIA nominee says she wouldn't restart interrogation program -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee to be the next CIA director says that if she is confirmed by the Senate, the spy agency will not undertake a detention and harsh interrogation program like the one used after 9/11.

12. State election systems still waiting for security checkups -

With the midterm congressional primaries about to go into full swing, the Department of Homeland Security is playing catch-up in helping to ensure that state election systems are secure against cybertampering by the Russians or others bent on mischief.

13. Homeland officials to talk election security -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators are expected to press Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen on the department's efforts to secure state election systems as the Senate Intelligence Committee launches an effort to safeguard against foreign meddling in this year's elections.

14. Senate committee launches effort to prevent election hacking -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the 2018 primary season already underway, leaders of the Senate intelligence committee are launching an effort to protect U.S. elections from a repeat episode of foreign interference.

15. US doing little to combat Russia meddling in next elections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Russians are going to try it again. Even President Donald Trump's intelligence chiefs say so. But with congressional primaries just two weeks away, the U.S. has done little to aggressively combat the kinds of Russian election meddling that was recently unmasked in federal court.

16. Grassley may release Russia interviews of Trump Jr., others -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Judiciary Committee is finishing its investigation into a June 2016 meeting between Russians and President Donald Trump's campaign, and the Republican chairman of that panel says he wants to release transcripts from closed-door interviews with Trump's son and others.

17. Social media firms urged to do more to fight Moscow meddling -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers demanded answers Wednesday from leading social media companies about why they haven't done more to combat Russian interference on their sites, and said congressional action might be needed in response to what one Democrat called "the start of cyberwarfare" against American democracy.

18. CIA watchdog nominee scolded for lack of preparation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee to be the CIA's independent watchdog has told Congress that he's never read the Senate's so-called torture report, an exhaustive, classified report of the agency's treatment of terror suspects after 9/11.

19. Trump targets Senate intel committee over Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is criticizing the Senate intelligence committee over its investigation into possible collusion between Russia and associates of the Trump campaign.

Trump said on Twitter Thursday: "Why Isn't the Senate Intel Committee looking into the Fake News Networks in OUR country to see why so much of our news is just made up-FAKE!"

20. Senate panel moves bill to deter foreign meddling in US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate is moving forward with legislation to combat cyberattacks and deter foreign interference amid an investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

The bill approved by the Senate intelligence committee 14-1 Thursday will now move to the Senate floor. According to the panel, the legislation would ensure the intelligence community is well-positioned to detect cyberattacks, strengthen information-sharing with states to protect voting systems and "send a message to Moscow that we will not accept their aggressive actions."

21. Reports say Mueller probe now examining possible obstruction -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The special counsel appointed to investigate Russian influence in the 2016 presidential campaign is now examining whether President Donald Trump tried to obstruct justice, it has been reported.

22. Senators to ask about Trump pushback on Russia investigation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A day before a Senate panel hears former FBI Director James Comey's first public account of his dramatic firing, lawmakers will question senior members of President Donald Trump's national security team about surveillance law and are expected to ask whether the president has tried to influence ongoing investigations into Russia's election meddling and possible coordination with the Trump campaign.

23. Russia-Trump campaign contacts a concern, ex-CIA chief says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former CIA Director John Brennan told Congress Tuesday he personally warned Russia last summer against interfering in the U.S. presidential election and was so concerned about Russian contacts with people involved in the Trump campaign that he convened top counterintelligence officials to focus on it.

24. GOP concerns on Trump and Comey pose threat to their agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Several Republican senators are questioning the timing of President Donald Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey. But even as the issue emerges as a potential distraction from the GOP's legislative agenda, most are dismissing Democratic calls for a special counsel, and their hand-wringing looks unlikely to lead to any concrete action.

25. Comey sought more Russia probe resources before firing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the days before his firing by President Donald Trump, FBI Director James Comey told U.S. lawmakers he had asked the Justice Department for more resources to pursue the bureau's investigation into Russia's interference in last year's presidential election, three U.S. officials said Wednesday.

26. Republicans question Trump's firing of FBI director -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than a dozen Republican senators voiced concerns Wednesday over President Donald Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey, in a series of statements suggesting the GOP was not yet prepared to close ranks behind its president. But most Republicans also refused to embrace Democratic calls for a special counsel and it was not clear their hand-wringing would result in any action.

27. AP Analysis: Trump thrusts US presidency into perilous area -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With his shocking dismissal of FBI Director James Comey, Donald Trump is propelling the presidency into rarely traversed territory.

His surprise announcement Tuesday flouts decades of presidential deference to the nation's top law enforcement agency and its independence. It earns Trump the dubious distinction of being the first president since Richard Nixon to fire the official overseeing an investigation involving the commander in chief. And it cements a clear pattern of a man willing to challenge — in dramatic fashion — the institutions created to hold the president accountable.

28. Trump defends Comey firing, says both parties will thank him -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump defended his firing of FBI Director James Comey, asserting in a flurry of tweets Wednesday that Republicans and Democrats "will be thanking me." Trump did not mention any effect the firing might have on the probe into contacts between his 2016 campaign and Russia.

29. Senate hearing to focus on Russian disinformation tactics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some tactics Russia used to meddle in last year's presidential election would give shivers to anyone who believes in American democracy, the Senate intelligence committee's top Democrat says.

30. Kushner, taking new White House role, faces rare scrutiny -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jared Kushner has been a power player able to avoid much of the harsh scrutiny that comes with working in the White House. But this week he's found that even the president's son-in-law takes his turn in the spotlight.

31. Tech companies move to target terrorist propaganda online -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter and YouTube are joining forces to more quickly identify the worst terrorist propaganda and prevent it from spreading online.

The new program announced Monday would create a database of unique digital "fingerprints" to help automatically identify videos or images the companies could remove.

32. Obama's trade agenda set to face House Democrats' objections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans pushed White House-backed trade legislation toward committee approval on Thursday despite strong objections by Democrats demanding stronger labor and environmental standards as well as a ban on currency manipulation by Asian nations.

33. Obama's trade agenda set to face House Democrats' objections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans pushed White House-backed trade legislation toward committee approval on Thursday despite strong objections by Democrats demanding stronger labor and environmental standards as well as a ban on currency manipulation by Asian nations.

34. Senate leaders propose extending NSA phone records storage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Weeks before a key surveillance law expires, Senate Republicans have introduced a bill that would allow the National Security Agency to continue collecting the calling records of nearly every American.

35. Some GOP want tax credits in health alternative -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A small, influential group of Republicans in search of a replacement health care law intends to propose tax credits to help lower-income individuals and families purchase insurance, while simultaneously jettisoning the controversial coverage requirement in the current law, officials said Wednesday.

36. Lawmakers face long to-do list, uncertain success -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A gridlocked Congress failed to do the big things: overhauling the nation's immigration system, reforming the loophole-cluttered tax code and stiffening background checks on gun buyers. Now it's time to see whether it can just do the basics.

37. Senate blocks Dems' bill boosting vets' benefits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Senate on Thursday derailed Democratic legislation that would have provided $21 billion for medical, education and job-training benefits for the nation's veterans. The bill fell victim to election-year disputes over spending and fresh penalties against Iran.

38. Senate heads toward showdown vote on veterans bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Democratic bill enhancing health care, education and job-training benefits for veterans faces an uphill climb as the Senate approaches a showdown vote on the $21 billion legislation.

39. Vets benefits bill should win initial Senate vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate seemed ready Tuesday to vote preliminary approval of a sprawling Democratic bill expanding health, education and other benefits for veterans. But the election-year measure faced conservative opposition and an uncertain fate as Republicans try to make it smaller and find ways to pay for it.

40. J. Alexander’s promotes Hagler to AVP, controller -

J. Alexander’s LLC, operator of J. Alexander’s restaurants and Stoney River Legendary Steak restaurants, has promoted Jessica Hagler to assistant vice president and controller.

41. Conservative group presses McConnell on health law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A conservative group is launching a radio ad challenging Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell to oppose any money for President Barack Obama's health care law even if it means triggering a government shutdown.

42. Tricky obstacles ahead to averting shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — There hasn't been a government shutdown in nearly two decades, but top lawmakers on Capitol Hill are finding trickier-than-usual obstacles in their path as they try to come up with must-do legislation to keep federal agencies running after Sept. 30.

43. Senate set to finish work on student loan deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Borrowing for tuition, housing and books would be less expensive for college students and their parents this fall but the costs would start climbing almost immediately under a deal the Senate was poised to pass Wednesday.

44. Senators ready to restore lower college loan rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators are ready to offer students a better deal on their college loans this fall, but future classes could see higher interest rates.

The Senate could vote as early as Thursday on a bipartisan compromise that heads off a costly increase for returning students.

45. Senators try again to lower student loan rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators are back to the starting line in their search for a compromise that would reduce interest rates on student loans after being spooked by the $22 billion price tag that accompanied a potential deal.

46. Deal emerging on student loans, talks continue -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An emerging deal to lower interest rates on student loans took shape Thursday, offering Democrats promises that interest rates would not reach 10 percent and giving Republicans a link between borrowing terms and the financial markets.

47. Student loan deal seems on edge of falling apart -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Efforts to keep interest rates on new student loans from doubling appeared to be falling apart Wednesday as the Democratic leader of the Senate declared a bipartisan proposal unacceptable.

48. Obama presses on with GOP charm offensive -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama pressed on with his Republican charm offensive Thursday, holding a White House lunch with House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan in an effort to soften the ground for potential talks on a long-term deficit reduction deal.

49. Efforts to avoid gov't shutdown move to Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Efforts to stave off a late March government shutdown shifted to the Senate after House Republicans swiftly passed legislation to keep federal agencies running, while also easing some of the effects of $85 billion in budget cuts.

50. Narrow 'fiscal cliff' bargain gains currency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hopes dimming for a wide-ranging bargain, the White House and many congressional Republicans are setting their sights on a more modest deal that would extend current tax rates for most Americans, raise rates for top earners and leave other, vexing issues for the new year.

51. Top residential real estate transactions for September 2012 -

September 2012 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

52. Top residential real estate transactions for August 2012 -

August 2012 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

53. Claim of Romney taxes theft a puzzling whodunit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Assuming it's not a hoax, the purported theft of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney's tax returns has all the trappings of a high-tech whodunit: a politically themed burglary, a $1 million demand in hard-to-trace Internet currency, password-protected data and a threat to reveal everything in three more weeks. But can it be believed?

54. Belcourt Theatre names new executive director -

The Belcourt Theatre board of directors has promoted managing director Stephanie Silverman to executive director. In addition, the board elected new officers for its 2012-2013 term:

55. Top commercial real estate transactions for May 2012 -

Top residential sales for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford and Wilson counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

56. Insider trading ban sent to White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday sent President Barack Obama a scaled-down bill to explicitly ban members of Congress, the president and thousands of other federal workers from profiting from nonpublic information learned on the job.