» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search

Name & Property Search

Search results for 'Bill Clinton' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:9
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:7
East Tennessee:2
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

TNLedger Knoxville Edition subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Why Democrats aren't ready to impeach Trump just yet -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some Democrats who will take the House majority in January are willing to say that President Donald Trump may have committed impeachable offenses. But that doesn't mean they will try to impeach him — at least not yet.

2. Bush saluted with praise, humor, cannons at capital farewell -

WASHINGTON (AP) — George H.W. Bush was celebrated with high praise and loving humor Wednesday as the nation bade farewell to the man who was America's 41st president and the last to fight for the U.S. in wartime. Three former presidents looked on at Washington National Cathedral as a fourth — George W. Bush — eulogized his dad.

3. Ceremonies for Bush draw together presidents, world envoys -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's capital bids its final farewell to the late former President George H.W. Bush on Wednesday in a service of prayer and praise that is drawing together world envoys, Americans of high office and a guy from Maine who used to fix things in Bush's house on the water.

4. Last salute: A guide to George HW Bush's funeral -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President George H.W. Bush is getting a national farewell at Washington National Cathedral before family, friends, presidents and foreign dignitaries.

The nation's 41st president died Friday in Houston at age 94. His wife of 73 years, Barbara, passed away in April.

5. Solemn public pays tribute to Bush before dawn in Rotunda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's capital embraced George H.W. Bush in death with solemn ceremony and high tributes to his service and decency, as the remains of the 41st president took their place in the Capitol Rotunda for three days of mourning and praise by the political elite and everyday citizens alike.

6. Last US Senate race of midterms up for vote in Mississippi -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi voters are deciding the last U.S. Senate race of the midterms, choosing between a white Republican Senate appointee backed by President Donald Trump and a black Democrat who was agriculture secretary when Bill Clinton was in the White House.

7. AP FACT CHECK: Trump myths on dipping oil prices, cold snaps -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is wrong when he suggests global warming can't be happening if it's really cold outside.

He points to a "brutal and extended cold blast" in the Eastern U.S. during Thanksgiving week and wonders aloud to his Twitter followers, "Whatever happened to Global Warming?" In fact, he is confusing short-term weather patterns with longer-term climate change. A scientific report put out Friday by his own administration rejects as folly any notion that a particular plunge in temperatures can cast doubt on whether Earth is warming.

8. Trump to rally for GOP's Senate candidate in Mississippi -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is heading to Mississippi for two rallies to try to keep a Senate seat in Republican hands.

Trump will be campaigning Monday for GOP Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith, who is in a runoff Tuesday against Democrat Mike Espy. The former congressman was agriculture secretary under President Bill Clinton.

9. Midterms reveal South split along urban, rural differences -

ATLANTA (AP) — The Solid South is no more. A century of rule by "Southern Democrats" followed by a generation of Republican domination is evolving into something more complex.

This month's midterms revealed a South that is essentially splitting in two. In states like Georgia and Texas, population growth and strong minority turnout propelled liberal Democrats such as Stacey Abrams and Beto O'Rourke to come close to statewide victories once thought impossible. Yet the Old Confederacy states in between are mostly holding to form, with white majorities giving President Donald Trump high marks and conservatives a clear advantage going forward.

10. Impeach the president? House Democrats saying not so fast -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Whatever happened to trying to impeach President Donald Trump? As House Democrats begin laying out the vision for their new majority, that item is noticeably missing from the to-do list and firmly on the margins.

11. Trump team turns over written answers to Mueller's questions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has provided the special counsel with written answers to questions about his knowledge of Russian interference in the 2016 election, his lawyers said Tuesday, avoiding at least for now a potentially risky sit-down with prosecutors. It's the first time he has directly cooperated with the long investigation.

12. Trump team turns over written answers to Mueller's questions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has provided the special counsel with written answers to questions about his knowledge of Russian interference in the 2016 election, his lawyers said Tuesday, avoiding at least for now a potentially risky sit-down with prosecutors. It's the first time he has directly cooperated with the long investigation.

13. Florida's partisan recount battle goes back to court -

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Florida's ongoing recount battle heads back to a courtroom Wednesday. Lawyers for Democrats will ask a federal judge to set aside the state law mandating that mailed-in votes be thrown out if the signature on the envelope doesn't match the signature on file with election authorities.

14. Trump, Democrats can take 2020 clues from midterm elections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — This week's midterm elections offered revealing lessons for both parties as battle lines begin to emerge for the 2020 presidential election.

For Democrats, a string of statewide victories in Rust Belt states opened a potential path back to the White House. But President Donald Trump's Republican Party found strength in critical states that often hold the keys to the presidency.

15. Democrats seize House control, but Trump's GOP holds Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats seized the House majority from President Donald Trump's Republican Party on Tuesday in a suburban revolt that threatened what's left of the president's governing agenda. But the GOP gained ground in the Senate and preserved key governorships, beating back a "blue wave" that never fully materialized.

16. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's fabrications on Medicare, immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the final days before pivotal midterm elections, President Donald Trump is painting a distorted picture of immigration while exaggerating his record of achieving economic gains for non-whites and improving health care for veterans.

17. More suspicious packages found, these to Booker, Clapper -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Suspicious packages addressed to New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and former National Intelligence Director James Clapper — and similar in appearance to pipe bomb devices sent to other prominent Democrats — have been intercepted, the FBI said Friday, as investigators scrambled from coast to coast to locate the culprit and motives behind a bizarre plot aimed at critics of President Donald Trump.

18. Package to DeNiro recovered, Trump tweets against media -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Police recovered a suspicious package addressed to actor Robert DeNiro on Thursday, which investigators said was similar to crude pipe bombs sent to prominent Democrats, including former President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, and to CNN.

19. AP FACT CHECK: Trump overreaches in bragging about judges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump overreached Monday night when he boasted that he's seated more federal judges than any president except George Washington. By various measures, he trails others.

20. Trump tells AP he won't accept blame if GOP loses House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing the prospect of bruising electoral defeat in congressional elections, President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he won't accept the blame if his party loses control of the House in November, arguing his campaigning and endorsements have helped Republican candidates.

21. Events -

Nashville Business Breakfast. Speaker: Gov. Bill Haslam. Allen Arena, Lipscomb University, One University Drive, Nashville. Thursday, 6:45-8:30 a.m. Fee: $40 in advance, $50 at the door. Free parking. Information

22. Help Wanted: Overseers for Social Security and Medicare -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Key posts overseeing the financial health of Social Security and Medicare have been vacant for more than three years, leaving the programs without independent accountability in the face of dire predictions about approaching insolvency.

23. AP FACT CHECK: Trump wrong on judges, 'plummeting' poverty -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the midterm elections draw near, President Donald Trump's tendency to declare his campaign promises fulfilled when they aren't has come into starker relief.

He insists poverty in the U.S. is "plummeting," even though the number of poor people has barely declined under his watch and income inequality is climbing.

24. New accusation rocks Kavanaugh nomination; Trump stands firm -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump staunchly defended his embattled Supreme Court nominee against a new allegation of sexual misconduct Monday, calling the accusations against Judge Brett Kavanaugh "totally political."

25. Tax law limit on deductions looms large in some House races -

CHERRY HILL, N.J. (AP) — Congressman Leonard Lance voted last December with the interests of his northern New Jersey district in mind when he opposed his own party's sweeping tax overhaul.

The cap on deductions for state and local taxes that was part of the Republican plan was bound to mean that many people in the high-tax state would pay more.

26. Withdraw Kavanaugh nomination? 'Ridiculous,' says Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump sided with his embattled Supreme Court nominee, defending Judge Brett Kavanaugh against allegations of sexual assault as the White House walked a fine line in addressing accusations that revived memories of the president's own #MeToo moments. Time and again, Trump has defended powerful men against the claims of women.

27. Booming sales for Woodward's 'Fear,' Trump presidency book -

Woodward's account of a dysfunctional Trump White House has already sold more than 750,000 copies, Simon & Schuster announced Wednesday, the day after the book arrived in stores.

"Fear" is virtually assured of joining Michael Wolff's "Fire and Fury" as a million-selling takedown of Trump. The pace of sales, which include print, e-books and an audio edition, is among the fastest in memory for a nonfiction work. In 2004, Bill Clinton's memoir "My Life" sold more than 1 million copies within eight days.

28. Bolton: International court 'dead to us' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States is pledging to use "any means necessary" to protect American citizens and allies from International Criminal Court prosecution.

President Donald Trump's national security adviser, John Bolton, says the court is "illegitimate" and "for all intents and purposes, the ICC is already dead to us."

29. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's not-so-strong Medicare, economy myths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Eager to dismiss his critics, President Donald Trump is fabricating the circumstances regarding jobs, the economy and the social safety net.

He insists that Social Security and Medicare are becoming stronger under his watch when the most recent government report shows the financial condition of both programs worsening. On the economy, his claims of spurring the strongest U.S. growth ever fall way short.

30. What to watch for as senators consider Kavanaugh nomination -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is set for a week of marathon hearings before the Judiciary Committee, where senators will drill down into the judge's background, writings and legal philosophy.

31. Kavanaugh pledges to be 'team player' on Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh promised Tuesday to be a "team player" if confirmed to the closely divided court, declaring that he will be a "pro-law judge" who won't decide cases based on his personal views.

32. Questions about Trump loom for Supreme Court nominee -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh may be the person sitting in front of senators at next week's confirmation hearings, but many of the questions he gets are likely to be focused on another man: President Donald Trump.

33. White House faces brain drain at perilous moment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Increasingly convinced that the West Wing is wholly unprepared to handle the expected assault from Democrats if they win the House in November, President Donald Trump's aides and allies are privately raising alarm as his circle of legal and communications advisers continues to shrink.

34. Primary takeaways: Establishment loses, diversity grows -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump got his man in battleground Florida, but he watched a prominent immigration ally fall in Arizona in what was another eventful night in the 2018 midterm season.

35. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's bent reality: Cohen, clean air, taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is living in an alternate reality when it comes to special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation and other controversies swirling around him.

He laments the threat of a "perjury trap" in explaining why he's hesitant to be interviewed by Mueller in the Russia probe, even as Trump's lawyers assert that Mueller had ruled out trying to indict a sitting president.

36. Brennan gets offers for legal action on clearance revocation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former CIA Director John Brennan said Sunday that he is considering taking legal action to try to prevent President Donald Trump from stripping other current and former officials' security clearances.

37. A timeline of major events in the life of Aretha Franklin -

DETROIT (AP) — A timeline of major events in the life and work of Aretha Franklin:

March 1942 — Aretha Franklin is born in Memphis, Tennessee. Her father, a prominent Baptist minister with gospel-music connections, would move the family briefly to Buffalo before settling in Detroit when Aretha was 2. She would call the city home for most of her life, and would always be closely associated with its massive musical legacy.

38. 'No one did it better' - Reaction to Aretha Franklin's death -

Reaction to the death of soul icon Aretha Franklin, who died Thursday:

"This morning my longest friend in this world went home to be with our father. I will miss her so much but I know she's at peace." — Smokey Robinson, in a statement.

39. 'Queen of Soul' Aretha Franklin dies at 76 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Aretha Franklin, the undisputed "Queen of Soul" who sang with matchless style on such classics as "Think," ''I Say a Little Prayer" and her signature song, "Respect," and stood as a cultural icon around the globe, has died at age 76 from pancreatic cancer.

40. 'Queen of Soul' Aretha Franklin has died -

NEW YORK (AP) — Aretha Franklin, the undisputed "Queen of Soul" who sang with matchless style on such classics as "Think," ''I Say a Little Prayer" and her signature song, "Respect," and stood as a cultural icon around the globe, has died at age 76 from pancreatic cancer.

41. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's economic fiction: 'record' GDP, jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is distorting the truth on U.S. economic growth and jobs, pointing to record-breaking figures that don't exist and not telling the full story on black unemployment.

42. 11 House Republicans seek impeachment of DOJ's Rosenstein -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans sharply escalated their months-long clash with the Justice Department as a group of 11 conservatives introduced articles of impeachment against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, the official who oversees special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation.

43. Senate Democrats ask for documents before Kavanaugh meetings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is turning up the pressure on Senate Democrats to meet with President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, though with little success.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh has met with 23 senators, all of them Republicans, since his nomination two weeks ago. Democratic lawmakers have been pushing for more information before holding any one-on-one meetings with the 53-year-old nominee.

44. AP FACT CHECK: Trump off base on Russia, vets, queen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It was a week of bewilderment over what President Donald Trump really thinks about Russian interference in the U.S. election and what he and Russia's Vladimir Putin told each other in their private meeting. The confusion was fed by Trump's vacillating statements about the summit.

45. Democrats wrestle with election-year message on health care -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Cheered on by a handful of activists, liberal House Democrats announced outside the Capitol that they were forming a caucus to push for "Medicare for All" — shorthand for government-financed health care.

46. Trump 'disagrees' with Putin offer to interview Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump "disagrees" with Russian President Vladimir Putin's offer to allow the U.S. to question 12 Russians accused of interfering in the 2016 election in exchange for permitting Russia to interview Americans the Kremlin accuses of unspecified crimes, the White House said Thursday.

47. Trump slams rate increases by independent Federal Reserve -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Thursday cast aside concerns about the Federal Reserve's independence, saying he was "not happy" with the Fed's recent interest rate increases.

Trump told CNBC in an interview: "I don't like all of this work that we're putting into the economy and then I see rates going up."

48. Facing critics over Putin summit, Trump wants to meet again -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Thursday he wants another meeting with Russia's Vladimir Putin to start implementing ideas they discussed in Helsinki, casting the summit as a starting point for progress on a number of shared concerns.

49. Amid harsh criticism, Trump tries a tougher tone on Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump spent a second day managing the political fallout from his widely criticized meeting with Russia's Vladimir Putin, shifting stances and mopping up what the White House said were misstatements.

50. Trump: news media wants confrontation, even war, with Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump accused the news media Thursday of trying to provoke a confrontation with Russia that could lead to war, as he continues to push back against criticism of his summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

51. A day after back-tracking, Trump defends summit performance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Taking to Twitter early Wednesday, President Donald Trump defended anew his much-criticized performance at the Helsinki summit, promising "big results" from better relations with Russia and hitting back at "haters."

52. 2 Supreme Court nominations made, Trump may have none to go -

WASHINGTON (AP) — What would it take for President Donald Trump to get yet another Supreme Court pick? Probably the death of a justice.

Trump has speculated that he could appoint a majority of the nine-member court. But it has been three decades since a president has been able to name more than two justices to their life-tenured posts, and Trump tied that number this week. The court's oldest remaining justices, two liberals and a conservative who are 85, 79 and 70, haven't suggested they're going anywhere and appear in fine health.

53. Kavanaugh's views of presidential power drawing questions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's past writings that a president should not be distracted by lawsuits and investigations could become a flashpoint in what's already shaping up to be a contentious confirmation battle.

54. Kavanaugh's professional life spent in GOP legal circles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Judge Brett Kavanaugh is the embodiment of the Republican legal establishment: an Ivy Leaguer who worked for the justice he has been nominated to replace, investigated a Democratic president, served in a Republican White House and now is an influential member of what is often called the second most powerful court in the country.

55. Analysis: Trump court pick aimed at cementing legacy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With fanfare befitting the nation's pre-eminent showman, President Donald Trump on Monday poured accelerant on his campaign to shift Washington's balance of power toward conservatives and remake the federal judiciary for generations to come.

56. Trump replaces high court's swing vote with conservative -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump chose Brett Kavanaugh, a solidly conservative, politically connected judge, for the Supreme Court, setting up a ferocious confirmation battle with Democrats as he seeks to shift the nation's highest court ever further to the right.

57. Who are the 4 Supreme Court contenders Trump has met so far? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has interviewed four prospective Supreme Court justices so far. Who are they?

AMY CONEY BARRETT

Barrett, 46, was a former law clerk to Justice Antonin Scalia and a longtime Notre Dame Law School professor. At her confirmation hearing last fall to become an appellate court judge, Democrats peppered Barrett on whether her Roman Catholic faith would interfere with her work. Democrats cited a 1998 paper in which she argued that Catholic judges might need to recuse themselves in death penalty cases.

58. Some lawmakers say they'd like to see one of theirs on court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Donald Trump considers his next Supreme Court pick, some Republicans in Congress want him to consider pulling from their ranks on Capitol Hill.

GOP Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas suggests his conservative ally, Sen. Mike Lee of Utah, would be "the single best choice" Trump could make to fill the vacancy.

59. Seivers in College Football Hall of Fame? Yeah, sure, why not? -

Don’t look for any campaign propaganda to be mailed out. There won’t be any personal stumping. Heck, Larry Seivers even refused to fluff up his own bio. If the former University of Tennessee two-time All-America wide receiver finds his way into the College Football Hall of Fame, it will happen because of the numbers and the memories that made him one of the game’s best in the 1970s.

60. Justice Kennedy retiring; Trump gets 2nd Supreme Court pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement Wednesday, giving President Donald Trump a golden chance to cement conservative control of the nation's highest court.

61. Looming question for Mueller probe: How much to make public? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America has waited a year to hear what special counsel Robert Mueller concludes about the 2016 election, meddling by the Russians and — most of all — what Donald Trump did or didn't do. But how much the nation will learn about Mueller's findings is very much an open question.

62. Trump's migrant policy: First blowback, then about-face -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As a crisis of migrant children separated from their families provoked national outrage, President Donald Trump said he was powerless to act through an executive order. Five days later, he did just that.

63. What statewide candidates say about health care - According to Think Tennessee’s State of Our State dashboard, the state ranks near the bottom in the number of adults with heart disease, obesity and diabetes. It also ranks near the bottom of all states for the health of senior citizens, infant mortality and number of adults who smoke, and at the absolute bottom in childhood obesity. Tennesseans are, on the whole, not healthy. What can and should our next political leaders do about it?

64. Blue wave? State Democrats more likely up a creek -

Tennessee Democrats are hoping a “blue wave” will wash across the Volunteer State this fall and help them regain a number of seats lost over the last decade. Republicans are banking on red voters to crush any wave by capitalizing on the popularity of President Donald Trump when November arrives.

65. AP FACT CHECK: More Trump falsehoods on NKorea, immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is exaggerating the achievements of his Singapore summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, claiming the North has destroyed missile launch sites and no longer has "rockets flying over the place."

66. Watchdog sees errors, not bias, in Comey's Clinton probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a stinging report, the Justice Department watchdog said Thursday that former FBI Director James Comey was "insubordinate" in his handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation during the 2016 presidential election. But it also concluded there was no evidence that Comey was motivated by political bias.

67. IG report expected to criticize Comey actions in email case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department's internal watchdog is expected to criticize the FBI's handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, stepping into a political minefield while examining how a nonpartisan law enforcement agency came to be entangled in the 2016 presidential race.

68. Report on FBI actions in Clinton email case set for release -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department's internal watchdog is expected to criticize the FBI's handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, stepping into a political minefield while examining how a determinedly nonpartisan law enforcement agency came to be entangled in the 2016 presidential race.

69. AP FACT CHECK: Trump bobbles facts on NKorea history, nukes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump celebrated his historic summit with North Korea's leader with remarks that twisted history and raised false hope that the remains of all missing Americans from the Korean War will be coming home.

70. Blackburn’s scattershot hits surprise targets -

Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn is doubling down against Democratic opponent Phil Bredesen in the race for an open U.S. Senate seat, hammering him as a liberal in the vein of Obama, Clinton, Schumer and Pelosi.

71. Trump's teasing jobs report tweet raises questions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With a tantalizing tweet, President Donald Trump seemed to tease a positive jobs report on Friday, a protocol-defying step that moved markets and raised questions about the appropriateness of the president publicly hinting at information that could make or lose fortunes.

72. False accusations about immigration fly between opponents -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and Democratic critics traded outraged, sometimes plainly false accusations about immigration as the debate over "lost" children and the practice of separating families caught crossing the border illegally reached a new boiling point.

73. Trump to rally in Tennessee, where crucial Senate race looms -

NASHVILLE (AP) — President Donald Trump is turning his attention to Tennessee, where he will raise money and rally supporters Tuesday in a crucial race for control of the U.S. Senate.

Trump hopes to boost Republican Rep. Marsha Blackburn in the open contest to replace GOP Sen. Bob Corker, who is retiring.

74. Trump the dealmaker facing challenges ahead of NKorea summit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Weeks before his planned North Korea summit, President Donald Trump is staring down a dealmaker's worst nightmare: overpromising and under-delivering.

As the Singapore meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un draws near, the president and his allies are growing increasingly anxious about how he can score a win on the world stage. While Trump has not suggested he wants to back out, he has struggled to define his objectives for the historic sit-down, and last week he drew fresh criticism from his foreign foil.

75. Asian American candidates join fight to oust GOP -

Members of the country's fastest growing minority group are running for federal office, dozens of them as Democratic candidates deliberately playing up their Asian roots against a president they say demonizes the immigrants that make America great.

76. Facebook ads show Russian effort to stoke political division -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats on the House intelligence committee have released more than 3,500 Facebook ads that were created or promoted by a Russian internet agency, providing the fullest picture yet of Russia's attempt to sow racial and political division in the United States before and after the 2016 election.

77. Asian American candidates join fight to oust GOP -

Members of the country's fastest growing minority group are running for federal office, dozens of them as Democratic candidates deliberately playing up their Asian roots against a president they say demonizes the immigrants that make America great.

78. Trump's new 'Stormy' story stuns many in West Wing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump insisted Thursday his reimbursement of a 2016 hush payment to porn actress Stormy Daniels had nothing to do with his election campaign. But the surprise revelation of the president's payment clashed with his past statements, created new legal headaches and stunned many in the West Wing.

79. In Trump era, the death of the White House press conference -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The presidential news conference, a time-honored tradition going back generations, appears to be no longer.

More than a year has passed since President Donald Trump held the only solo news conference of his administration — a rollicking, hastily arranged, 77-minute free-for-all during which he railed against the media, defended his fired national security adviser and insisted nobody who advised his campaign had had contacts with Russia.

80. Oil, gas drilling in pristine Alaska refuge takes step ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is moving toward oil and gas drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, fulfilling a longtime Republican priority that most Democrats fiercely oppose.

81. DOJ watchdog finds himself in familiar political hot seat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump wasted no time before seizing on last week's report by the Justice Department's internal watchdog on misconduct allegations against the FBI's former No. 2 official, Andrew McCabe. Trump tweeted it was proof that his archrival James Comey, the former FBI director, "totally controlled" McCabe.

82. Defending Trump in Russia probe? It's hardly a dream job -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Several prominent lawyers asked to help represent President Donald Trump in the last year have spurned the assignment at least partly out of concerns he wouldn't pay his bills and doesn't listen to legal advice, according to people familiar with the conversations.

83. Anxiety grows for Trump after raid on his personal lawyer -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his allies have hit a new level of anxiety after the raid on his personal attorney's office, fearful of deeper exposure for Trump, his inner circle and his adult children — and more than concerned that they don't know exactly what is in those records and electronic devices seized last week.

84. Trump: Syria attack 'very soon or not so soon at all!' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Thursday that an attack on Syria could take place "very soon or not so soon at all," arguing he had never signaled the timing of retaliation for a suspected chemical weapons attack that he had suggested was imminent a day earlier.

85. Trump: Syria attack 'very soon or not so soon at all!' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Thursday that an attack on Syria could take place "very soon or not so soon at all," arguing he had never signaled the timing of retaliation for a suspected chemical weapons attack that he had suggested was imminent a day earlier.

86. CEO Zuckerberg apologizes for Facebook's privacy failures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Under fire for the worst privacy debacle in his company's history, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg batted away often-aggressive questioning from lawmakers who accused him of failing to protect the personal information of millions of Americans from Russians intent on upsetting the U.S. election.

87. Attorney for porn star seeks to depose Trump on payment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An attorney for an adult film star claiming a sexual encounter with President Donald Trump filed a motion Wednesday seeking to depose the president and his attorney.

Michael Avenatti filed the papers in federal court in California. In the documents, he seeks to depose Trump and Trump attorney Michael Cohen about a $130,000 payment made to Stormy Daniels days before the 2016 presidential election.

88. Tennessee Senate OKs social media political disclosure bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Senate has passed a bill that would spell out requirements to disclose who paid for sponsored political content on social media platforms.

The Republican-led Senate approved the legislation in a 17-8 vote Monday. It heads to the House.

89. Trump lawyers have no easy options on interview request -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The special counsel's office wants to talk to Donald Trump about the firings of James Comey and Michael Flynn, but as the president's lawyers negotiate the terms and scope of a possible interview, they're left with no easy options.

90. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's trouble with numbers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has a creative approach to numbers. Whether he's talking about a half dozen or a half trillion, he tends to make them what he wants them to be.

So it was at a political rally on the weekend following days of rhetoric on many fronts. A look at a selection of his statements over the past week:

91. AP Analysis: NRA gave $7 million to hundreds of schools -

The National Rifle Association has given more than $7 million in grants to hundreds of U.S. schools in recent years, according to an Associated Press analysis, but few have shown any indication that they'll follow the lead of businesses that are cutting ties with the group following last month's massacre at a Florida high school.

92. Nashville sites included in new US civil rights trail -

MEMPHIS (AP) — State officials say 10 Tennessee landmarks are being included in a new civil rights trail.

Gov. Bill Haslam and state tourism commissioner Kevin Triplett plan to announce the Tennessee sites on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail on Wednesday in Memphis.

93. GOP women frustrated by Trump's approach to abuse charges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump White House's handling of abuse charges against men in its midst is frustrating prominent Republican women as the party's yearslong struggle to attract female voters stretches into the 2018 midterm elections.

94. Russian hackers hunt hi-tech secrets, exploiting US weakness -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Russian cyberspies pursuing the secrets of military drones and other sensitive U.S. defense technology tricked key contract workers into exposing their email to theft, an Associated Press investigation has found.

95. Trump falsely claims most-watched State of Union -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump says the ratings for his first State of the Union address this week are "the highest number in history," but that is not true.

Nielsen reports that about 45.6 million tuned in to watch Trump Tuesday night. That's below viewership for President Barack Obama's first State of the Union, which was about 48 million, and Trump's own joint address to Congress last year.

96. Judge hints at taking up Trump foreign payments case -

GREENBELT, Md. (AP) — A federal judge in Maryland hinted Thursday that he may take up a case questioning whether President Donald Trump's business empire violates the "emoluments" clause of the Constitution.

97. Trump in Davos: threatens Palestinians, reassures Brits -

DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) — President Donald Trump barreled into a global summit in the Swiss Alps on Thursday, threatening to stop U.S. aid to the Palestinians and dismissing as a "false rumor" the idea that there are tensions in the U.S. relationship with Britain.
Trump's debut appearance at the glitzy World Economic Forum was hotly anticipated, with longtime attendees of the free-trade-focused event wondering how the "America First" president would fit in. Crowds clustered around Trump as he entered the modern conference hall, the president telling passers-by that he was bringing a message of "peace and prosperity."
Trump framed his visit as a sign of positive things happening for the U.S. economy.
"When I decided to come to Davos, I didn't think in terms of elitist or globalist, I thought in terms of lots of people that want to invest lots of money and they're all coming back to the United States, they're coming back to America," the president told CNBC.
His meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, a close ally, was their first since the president announced earlier this month that he would recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital and move the U.S. embassy there. The declaration delighted Netanyahu and outraged Palestinians, who declared a new U.S.-led peace push dead and refused to meet with Vice President Mike Pence during his recent visit to the Mideast.
Trump took that as an affront.
"They disrespected us a week ago by not allowing our great vice president to see them and we give them hundred of millions of dollars in aid and support," Trump said. "That money is not going to them unless they sit down and negotiate peace."
Netanyahu was effusive in his praise for Trump, saying the president's recent announcement on Jerusalem was a "historic decision that will be forever etched in the hearts of our people."  The Palestinians, in turn, said Trump's "language of dictation is unacceptable," in the words of spokesman Nabil Abu Rdeneh.
Past American presidents have expressed irritation with the Palestinian leadership but no previous administration has threatened to cut off assistance to the Palestinians unless they agreed to negotiate with Israel.
Washington has contributed over $5 billion in economic and security aid to the Palestinians since the mid-1990s. Annual economic aid since 2008 has averaged around $400 million, much of it devoted to development projects. State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said all bilateral assistance to the Palestinians, including economic security aid, is at risk if the Palestinians don't come to the negotiating table.
Trump, who has called an agreement to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict the "ultimate deal," said Thursday that he had taken Jerusalem— one of the thorniest issues — "off the table," although U.S. officials have stressed repeatedly that the decision has no impact on negotiations over the borders or sovereignty of the holy city. Trump told Netanyahu that Israel had "won" on the matter but would have to make concessions to the Palestinians in any eventual talks.
Trump met separately with British Prime Minister Theresa May, batting away the idea that their relationship is strained after he canceled a recent visit to London and May criticized him for retweeting a U.K. far-right group's anti-Muslim videos.
Trump declared it a "really great relationship." May described it as a "really special relationship."
But their meeting was more muted than Trump's session with Netanyahu and they did not respond to shouted questions about the videos.
After the meeting, May's office said the two leaders "concluded by asking officials to work together on finalizing the details of a visit by the President to the UK later this year." White House officials said the visit would be a "working visit," featuring less pomp than a full state visit. They said plans for an official state visit would come later.
Absent from the Davos scene: first lady Melania Trump. She was originally scheduled to attend the forum but later scrapped that plan, citing scheduling and logistics problems. The reversal came after reports emerged of an adult film star's account of an alleged affair with Donald Trump in 2006.
Trump is the first sitting president to attend Davos since Bill Clinton in 2000. The protectionist-leaning president's last-minute decision to attend the annual gathering for political and business elites was unexpected. Trump has criticized global pacts, withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) on trade, demanding changes to the North American Free Trade Agreement and announcing his intent to exit the Paris climate accord.
But he drew enthusiastic praise for his tax-cut law at a dinner that he hosted Thursday for more than a dozen business executives from Nokia, Adidas, SAP and other companies, with the business leaders praising his tax plan and pledging to invest more in the United States before their tucked into their beef tenderloin.
Trump called the assembled executives, all male, "some of the greatest business leaders in the world," before asking them to go around the table and talk about how their businesses are doing in the U.S.
While the businesses praised Trump, another Davos takeaway was that, without Trump's participation, other countries are still moving forward with trade deals.
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau revealed at Davos this week that his country and the 10 remaining members of the Trans-Pacific Partnership have revised their trade deal following the U.S. withdrawal.
Trump said in an interview with CNBC that he would consider re-entering the TPP if it was a "better deal" for the U.S.
"The deal was terrible, the way it was structured was terrible," he said.
Top Trump officials this week insisted that "America First" did not mean "America alone." Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the philosophy simply means that "President Trump is looking out for American workers and American interests, no different than he expects other leaders would look out for their own."
Other administration officials had a clear message for critics.
Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao said Davos "should feel very flattered" by Trump's attendance. She added: "Those that don't want to listen, you can — they can — leave."
___
AP Writer Matthew Lee contributed from Warsaw, Poland.

98. Dollar tumbles after US treasury chief welcomes weaker value -

DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) — The U.S. treasury chief welcomed a weaker dollar on Wednesday, breaking with a decades-long commitment by the U.S. government to back a strong dollar.

The comments led to an immediate, sharp drop in the value of the dollar in currency markets.

99. Trump to face mixed welcome at elite Davos gathering -

DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) — In Davos this week, participants can experience "a day in the life of a refugee." Or hear about ways to uphold the Paris climate accord and promote free trade. Or rub elbows with any number of leaders of African countries.

100. Middle Tennessee's $1M-plus residential transactions for 2017 -

There were 735 homes selling for $1 million or more in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner and Wilson counties in 2017, according to Chandler Reports.

Davidson County had the most with 386, followed by Williamson (316), Sumner (21), Wilson (10) and Rutherford (2).